Politics

Prop. 8 challenges go to CA Supreme Court

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

From the streets to the courts, the battle over Proposition 8 is now headed to the California Supreme Court, which will consider challenges to the ban on gay marriage.

It has been two weeks and a day since California voters approved Proposition 8. Now the state's high court has accepted three lawsuits challenging that constitutional amendment banning gay marriage.

This has been a very controversial legal battle with emotions running high on both sides of this issue. The latest chapter came when voters rejected gay marriage on a statewide ballot measure. But now the state supreme court says it will re-visit the measure's validity.

Proposition 8 is a voter-approved constitutional amendment that overruled the state supreme court's decision that legalized gay marriage in May of this year.

The high court had said that the state's previous ban on gay marriage violated California's constitution.

But in the weeks since the approval of Proposition 8, there have been numerous protests in Los Angeles and throughout California calling for the high court to overturn the measure.

Wednesday, the court said it will accept three lawsuits seeking to nullify Prop. 8.

The lawsuits say that Prop. 8 violates the civil rights of a vulnerable minority group, and that voters alone do not have the authority to enact such a significant constitutional change.

In response, Randy Thomasson, a supporter of Prop. 8 and president of the Campaign for Children and Families, said: "It's unfortunate that the judges are giving time to the mushy, subjective arguments of homosexual activists who reject the clear reading of the constitution and the clear reading of Proposition 8. If the court disobeys the constitution by voiding Prop. 8, it will ignite a voter revolt."

California Attorney General Jerry Brown, a Prop. 8 opponent, also released a statement Wednesday afternoon: "This is welcome news. The matter of Proposition 8 should be resolved thoughtfully and without delay."

Brown had petitioned the high court to assume jurisdiction over these lawsuits so the matter could be resolved quickly.

According to a Supreme Court spokeswoman, arguments could begin as early as March 2009.


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