I-Team

SFPD 'Videogate' hearings resume

Thursday, August 19, 2010
Officer Wendy Hurley is part of the SFPD Videogate scandal. Cops Gone Wild - the video at the center of the Videogate scandal. Inside the SFPD
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One of the last disciplinary hearings into the San Francisco Police Department's 'Videogate' scandal finally got underway Wednesday after an I-Team investigation revealed more controversial comedy videos.

Officer Wendy Hurley wants people to see what happened; she took the unusual step of requesting that her hearing be open to the public and to ABC7's camera.

The hearing began where the controversy started; Hurley's defense team played 'Inside the SFPD.'

Officer Andrew Cohen produced the documentary in 2005 with the approval of the chief at the time, Heather Fong. It profiled the Bayview Station, including the shooting death of Officer Isaac Espinoza.

When Bayview Captain Rick Bruce announced his retirement, Hurley said officers had the idea to use outtakes from 'Inside the SFPD' and other department public affairs videos for a going away present for Bruce.

"He was a commander at the time, he had done some funny tongue rolling things to warm up when he would do speeches," Hurley said.

They shot additional footage and put together a 26 minute comedy video that became known as 'Cops Gone Wild.'

Hurley testified the lieutenants and captain authorized the comedy video. The department even paid for supplies used in the production; the defense showed invoices for videotapes, DVDs and other supplies, in the hearing Wednesday.

Hurley says the officers and brass enjoyed watching clips as they were being put together at Bayview Station.

"It was taking our minds off so much of the sadness that had been a part of our station, everybody was enjoying it, the bosses were laughing," Hurley said.

Hurley also testified she had seen the department's older comedy videos, Christmas party and roast tapes, and that she felt comfortable participating in 'Cops Gone Wild' because no one else had gotten into trouble before.

With the hearings now open to the public, they are taking longer than expected. Hurley was the only witness Wednesday and at the end, Police Commissioner Jim Hammer got to the central issue.

Hammer: "At the time you made the video or took part in the video, did it occur to you that it might bring discredit upon the San Francisco Police Department?"

Hurley: "No."

Hammer: "As you sit here today, does it occur to you that that video and your participation might bring discredit to the San Francisco Police Department?"

Hurley: "No."

Looking back at 'Videogate' and 'Cops Go Wild'
'Videogate' hearings postponed after I-Team report
SFPD 'Videogate' case finally wrapping up
BLOG: New 'Videogate' videos
'Cops Gone Wild' video producer investigated
SFPD video scandal: Judge scolds cops
Chief Fong points the finger at Newsom
Cop Spoof Video Goes After City Officials
SFPD Video Scandal: No Punishment For Asian Cops
SFPD Video Scandal: Cops Want Newsom Under Oath

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Tags:
gavin newsom, SFPD, george gascon, i-team, dan noyes
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