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Bryan Stow's family faces men sentenced for attack at Dodger Stadium

Thursday, February 20, 2014
Two men sentenced in Bryan Stow beating Marvin Norwood and Louie Sanchez sentenced in beating of Bryan Stow. Bryan Stow

In Los Angeles Thursday, two men pleaded guilty to the beating that left San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow brain damaged and severely disabled. The family of the Santa Cruz paramedic had a chance to address the men, and even the judge weighed in.

The Stow family in court made it clear from the get-go that there would be no forgiveness for these two men after what they did to Bryan. They did say that they were relieved that this chapter is over. But everything they talked about in court was rooted in the fact that nothing that happened Thursday changes what happened to Bryan.

"What you both did, late in the evening in the dark at Dodger stadium, was cowardly," David Stow said.

David could barely look at Marvin Norwood and Louie Sanchez, the two men who brutally beat his son Bryan, the Giants fan who faces a life of disability; unable to take care of his own most basic needs.

"Bryan has a lifetime of pain, therapy, hard work daily that he must endure," David said. "He will strive to persevere."

The attack happened in the parking lot of Dodger Stadium after the opening game between the Giants and the Dodgers in 2011.

Sanchez and Norwood were arrested after a lengthy manhunt and acknowledged their involvement during a series of secretly recorded jailhouse conversations.

Norwood was recorded telling his mother by phone that he was involved and saying, "I will certainly go down for it."

The words the two men spoke in a jail lockup, unaware they were being recorded, were played at a previous preliminary hearing as they were ordered to stand trial on charges of mayhem and assault and battery.

Sanchez acknowledged he attacked a Giants fan, and Norwood said he had no regrets about backing him up.

Witnesses testified about the parking lot confrontation, saying Stow was jumped from behind and his head crashed to the pavement. While he was on the ground, Sanchez kicked him in the head three times, they said.

Norwood pleaded guilty to one count of assault causing great bodily injury for his involvement in the beating.

Louie Sanchez was sentenced to eight years after pleading guilty to mayhem. He is the one who initially attacked Stow from behind; a brutal punch that sent the former paramedic's head into the pavement.

"You're smiling," Judge George Lomeli said. "You think it's funny?"

During the sentencing, Sanchez was reprimanded by the judge for his smiles and disinterested behavior.

"Even now, with your smirks," Judge Lomeli said. "I'm talking about Mr. Sanchez, not so much Mr. Norwood, you show no remorse whatsoever. No remorse to the family here."

"She expressed her sadness for both the Stow family and the two men that she loves," attorney Daniel Nardoni said.

Nardoni represents Sanchez's sister Doreen, who provided key evidence against her brother and Norwood, her fiancé.

"Two sides have been hurt, but primarily the Stow family, and I think that should be the primary focus," Nardoni said.

Stow's family said in court they welcome the end to this chapter of their tragedy, but they cannot forgive the two men who so dramatically altered Bryan's life.

"You get to live your life as you choose," said Bryan's sister, Bonnie Stow. "Bryan did not choose this. No sentence you received will ever be long enough. Eventually you will be released. Bryan's sentence is a lifetime."

Both teams issued brief statements after the sentencing.

"We are pleased that the culpable parties have finally accepted responsibility for their actions and have been sentenced for their crimes," the Dodgers said. The team did not comment further, citing a pending civil suit over the attack.

Giants' spokeswoman Shana Daum said, "We continue to support Bryan and his family and hope that this development will help the Stows as they move forward from this tragic event."

Giants third base coach Tim Flannery has grown close to the Stow family. In video provided by the team, Flannery called the Stow beating a "hate crime," and praised the family, "They're the best family I think I've ever been around," he said. "They've inspired me to be a better family man. They all became full time care givers for the rest of their lives at that moment. None of them have not put that responsibility first. It's an amazing family. There's no love like the Stow love."

(The Associated Press contributed to this report)

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Tags:
bryan stow, crime, violence, san francisco giants, los angeles, southern california, lawsuit, los angeles dodgers, california news, laura anthony
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