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Tiempo: Watch this week's show

Sunday, April 13, 2014
Tiempo on April 13th, 2014: Part 1 Tiempo on April 13th, 2014: Part 2 Tiempo on April 13th, 2014: Part 3 Tiempo on April 13th, 2014: Part 4 Tiempo on April 6th, 2014: Part 1 Tiempo on April 6th, 2014: Part 2 Tiempo on April 6th, 2014: Part 3 Tiempo on April 6th, 2014: Part 4 Tiempo on March 30th, 2014: Part 1 Tiempo on March 30th, 2014: Part 2 Tiempo on March 30th, 2014: Part 3 Tiempo on March 30th, 2014: Part 4

Concerned about the Hispanic community? If you are, be sure to tune into "Tiempo."

"Tiempo" is a weekly round-table discussion show about topics affecting and relating to Hispanic citizens.

Please join us for "Tiempo" on Sunday mornings, only on ABC7!

CONTACT US: Click here to send us an email.

April 13th, 2014
This morning we look at a celebration of culture, Uptown. It's a month-long festival in Upper Manhattan now in the works. We'll show you how you can take part.

First, the new wave of Puerto Ricans leaving the island. There are more Boricuas moving here to our area. This is part of a Puerto Rico exodus triggered by several factors.

To break down what's going on here, we're joined by Brenda Torres Barreto, the regional office director of the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration, and Edwin Meléndez, the director of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College.

Related Content

Links Seen on our Show
  • www.nomaanyc.org
  • www.whinmusicproject.org
  • www.peoplestheatreproject.org
    April 6th, 2014
    A Broadway star who's giving Latino kids a chance to shine and have fun; it's a free program, parents will want to hear about.

    First though, the overhaul at the National Puerto Rican Day Parade. Much of the old leadership was forced out after a state investigation uncovered years of alleged money mismanagement.

    A new board is now in place. This year's parade up fifth avenue's set for June 8, but the scandal and changes have left many wondering if the celebration could be in danger.

    We're joined by two new parade leaders: Treasurer and Executive Board member Rosa Gutierrez and board member Louis Maldonado.

    Links Seen on our Show

  • www.nprdpinc.org/
  • revolucionlatina.org/

    March 30th, 2014
    Learning English as a second language? We'll show you the community teaming up to give young people a new place to learn.

    First, Latinos who can't afford to get sick. A new law could change that.

    Starting Tuesday, April 1, more than a half-a-million New Yorkers will have the right to call out sick to work without losing their pay or their job. Mayor Bill de Blasio signed the paid sick leave bill into law with City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito by his side. It requires businesses with five or more workers to provide up to five paid sick days to employees.

    Joining us in the studio this morning, Lucia Gomez, the executive director of La Fuente, and Lou Gasco, the founder and president of MuTo Performance Corporation.

    March 16th, 2014
    Some surprising news about Latino students: a report finds our young people here in the five boroughs are more likely to graduate from career and technical high schools than traditional schools. We'll look into what could be behind this trend.

    First, she has been here with us on Tiempo before. Last time she was here, she was a city council member. Now, Melissa Mark-Viverito is the city council speaker, the first Latina to lead New York's City Council.

    March 9th, 2014
    Some interesting topics this morning. There's new information about Nuestra Salud. Who's in the best health? The answer might surprise you.

    But first, we want to tell you about an upcoming event that can give you a real leg up - educationally. The Latino College Expo helps connect students and parents with resources and contacts at dozens of colleges and universities. This is the expo's 24th year. What an achievement!

    Joining us is Antonio Aponte, one of the founders of the expo. Ricardo Gabriel, who attended the expo and is currently working toward his doctorate in Sociology at CUNY Graduate School.

    Links Seen on our Show

  • www.latinocollege-expo.org

    March 2nd, 2014
    This morning, we are going to help you take the pain out of tax season. We'll take you to a place where you can get help filing your taxes for free. Que bueno.

    First, the crisis in Venezuela, and divide right here in New York City. Rival protest groups recently clashed in Union Square. Police took several people into custody.

    In Venezuela, there is a bitter divide between opponents and supporters of the President Nicolas Maduro.

    I'm joined by Alejandro Velasco, assistant professor of Latin American Studies at NYU Gallatin School. Also, Ted Henken, associate professor of Latin American Studies at Baruch College and president of the Association for the Study of the Cuban Economy.

    Links Seen on our Show

  • VITA site location

    February 23rd, 2014
    We have important information for Latinos looking to buy their first casita.

    But first, scandal rocks the National Puerto Rican Day Parade here in New York City. The parade is a beloved celebration of culture and pride that has graced the streets of midtown for decades.

    Now, an investigation by State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman reveals alleged mismanagement and fraud, apparently to the tune of one-million dollars. The parade leader has stepped down. Is this year's celebration in jeopardy?

    We are joined by State Senator Ruben Diaz, senior of the Bronx, and Gerson Borrero, a political commentator and columnist, who first broke the story about the investigation for the New York Post.

    Links Seen on our Show

  • www.hcci.org
  • www.nhsnyc.org

    February 16th, 2014
    This morning: Making sure our children go to college. Yes, we've talked about that a lot lately here on Tiempo, but when the president and Mrs. Obama make it a priority, that's big news.

    We'll talk to a local college leader who received a personal invitation to the White House to talk about that very issue.

    First, we will talk about Mayor Bill de Blasio's first State of the City Address. He promised to reach out to all New Yorkers and for undocumented immigrants, he wants to provide them with something very important: an identity card.

    February 9th, 2014
    Today, we have important information for college bound students and parents: finding the money to pay for college. This morning, we will introduce you to some people who can walk you through the process in English and Spanish.

    First though, groups improving the lives and giving a voice to thousands of workers in New York City. We're joined by Ligia Guallpa, the executive director of the "Workers Justice Project." Eudes Salas, a worker helped by the group, has an inspirational story to tell. and Valeria Treves, the executive director of the "New Immigrant Community Empowerment" Center, speaks to us.

    Links Seen on our Show

  • www.collegegoalny.com
  • www.workersjustice.org
  • www.nynice.org

    February 2nd, 2014
    This morning, we will look at a topic of great concern to many Latino families taking care of aging parents.

    But first, a New York City attraction, also creating opportunities for Latino families.

    The High Line Park, built on an old railway line along the west side of Manhattan, is an area that's home to many Latinos, and the mile long trail is not only a great place to walk and take in scenic views, it's also becoming a center of culture and education for Latinos.

    Joining me today, the man behind it all: Gonzalo Casals. He's the director of programs and community engagement at Friends of the High Line.

    January 26th, 2014
    This morning, we will look at a topic of great concern to many Latino families: taking care of aging parents.

    But first, a major initiative: making sure our children go to college. It's an issue President and Mrs. Obama have made it one of their priorities. They recently hosted an education summit at the White House. The goal: to find solutions to help more low-income students go to college and graduate.

    January 19th, 2014
    We will look at one aspect of education that is so critical to the learning process. Specifically, helping families of limited financial means - many of them Latinos - get low cost computers and internet access.

    But first, we'll talk to the director of the Hispanic Federation in Connecticut. The agency just opened its doors in the Nutmeg State to bring together the state's growing and diverse Latino population.

    We are joined by Ingrid Alvarez-DiMarzo, the Connecticut State Director of the Hispanic Federation and Yanil teron, Executive Director of the Center for Latino Progress in Hartford, Connecticut, one of the non-profit members of the federation.

    January 12th, 2014
    We will look at one aspect of education that is so critical to the learning process. Specifically, helping families of limited financial means - many of them Latinos - get low cost computers and internet access.

    But first, we'll talk to the director of the Hispanic Federation in Connecticut. The agency just opened its doors in the Nutmeg State to bring together the state's growing and diverse Latino population.

    We are joined by Ingrid Alvarez-DiMarzo, the Connecticut State Director of the Hispanic Federation and Yanil teron, Executive Director of the Center for Latino Progress in Hartford, Connecticut, one of the non-profit members of the federation.

    January 5th, 2014 (Originally aired on November 24th, 2013)
    The "Language Access Policy", among other things, mandates the translation of important document into the top six languages spoken by residents who speak limited English. It also provides translation services and designates a language access coordinator in all county government offices.

    Here to talk about this major step towards improving relations with the Suffolk's Ethnic Community is County Executive Steven Bellone, Det. Lt. Robert Donohue, the commanding officer of the Community Response Bureau, Suffolk County Pd and Karina Claudio from the Immigrant Rights Organization "Make The Road New York."

    Links Seen on our Show

  • www.lehman.edu
  • Phone: 347.577.4080

    December 29th, 2013 (Originally aired on August 25th, 2013)
    Today, we have a special show, devoting all of Tiempo to an acting legend: Rita Moreno, the star of the silver screen, the stage and television.

    One of Moreno's best known roles was "Anita" in the groundbreaking movie "West Side Story," for which she won an Oscar.

    In the course of her career, she's also won a Tony, Grammy and two Emmys.

    Now, Ms. Moreno has put another feather in her cap; she is a New York Times bestselling author for her first book, "Rita Moreno: Memorias," available in Spanish and English.

    Here to talk about her book and her incredible career is Rita Moreno.

    December 22nd, 2013
    Falling temperatures means a rise in energy bills. We'll show you a way to save money and get help paying your bills. You can get help in Spanish too.

    First, Bill Bratton returns as New York City's police commissioner with a promise to "get it right." He vows to reform the NYPD's use of "stop and frisk." But do Latinos welcome Bratton this time around?

    We're joined by Detective Dennis Gonzalez, the president of the NYPD Hispanic Society, and Noel Carrascal with Hispanics for Safe Communities.

    Links Seen on our Show

  • www.heartshare.org
  • Phone number: 718-422-4207

    December 15th, 2013
    An incredible honor for a doctor in the Bronx. First, legislation that would provide tuition equality in New Jersey. The Garden State's version of the Dream Act.

    As it stands now, undocumented students who live in New Jersey pay much more tuition at state than those who are citizens, and that often puts their dreams of getting a higher a tuition equality bill is being put forward. It comes with some requirements. We'll walk you through those.

    The senate bill offers the same tuition to students who attend high school in New Jersey for three or more years. It also requires students first earn a diploma or GED from their New Jersey high school and file an affidavit with the college they plan to attend stating they've started or will soon start legalizing immigration status.

    Joining us this morning to talk about the bill and where it stands is Anna Maria at Tejada, president of the Spanish Association of New Jersey, and State Senator Ruiz, sponsor of the Bill and Carol Ruiz, no relation, A Student of Law.

    December 8th, 2013
    We are focusing on two topics this morning. We discuss on how a new law clinic hopes to fight for those who can't afford high priced lawyers.

    But first, why prosecutors hope a new video will show Latino victims of crime they have options.

    November 24th, 2013
    The "Language Access Policy", among other things, mandates the translation of important document into the top six languages spoken by residents who speak limited English. It also provides translation services and designates a language access coordinator in all county government offices.

    Here to talk about this major step towards improving relations with the Suffolk's Ethnic Community is County Executive Steven Bellone, Det. Lt. Robert Donohue, the commanding officer of the Community Response Bureau, Suffolk County Pd and Karina Claudio from the Immigrant Rights Organization "Make The Road New York."

    November 17th, 2013
    A news legend will soon retire. Rafael Pineda has been behind the anchor desk at Univision 41 news for more than 42 years. He says farewell next month. We'll chat with Rafael about his incredible career later in the show.

    But first, this month the Federal Food Stamp Program , known as SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program), was cut by 5 percent - that saves the government about five billion next year. But it creates some major financial challenges for many people of limited means who will now be forced to make some painful sacrifices, and that includes many Latinos who depend on the program to put food on their tables.

    In turn, that will put the squeeze on food pantries and soup kitchens in our area as many more individuals and families will to turn to these resources so they don't go hungry.

    Joining us is Diana Tennant, SNAP coordinator for the Foodbank of Monmouth and Ocean counties. Also stopping by is Lisa Hines-Johnson, the COO of Food Bank for New York City, the country's largest.

    November 10th, 2013
    Money always is a hot topic. The way to financial stability is knowing how to better manage your budget. We'll talk to people who run workshops aped aimed specifically at helping Latinos improve their financial situation.

    First, an important topic, your health. Flu season has begun. Though it's not in full swing it's important to get a jumpstart, get the flu shot now. The flu is a terrible illness that can keep you in bed for up to two weeks, and can also be deadly.

    Studies show Latinos are less likely to get the flu shot than non-Hispanic whites, but this year there's new protection and new products.

    October 27th, 2013
    This morning, a 40th anniversary celebration for the Center for Puerto Rican Studies - an exhibit and festivities you wont want to miss as we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month.

    But first, New York state is in an organ donor crisis, ranking 47th nationally in donations, and for Latino Americans in need of an organ, that ranking is especially worrisome.

    Latinos have high rates of diabetes, heart disease and hypertension conditions known to put people at risk for organ failure.

    Now, a new law went into effect on October 3rd, aimed at getting people to think about registering to be organ donors.

    Links Seen on our Show

  • donatelife.net
  • donatelifeny.org/hate-the-wait

    October 13th, 2013
    Today, we devote our entire show to a very important topic, and yes, one that needs a lot of explaining: the Affordable Care Act, known to many as Obamacare.

    It took effect earlier this month and represents a major step in helping more than 50 million uninsured Americans choose health care.

    On October 1st, people started signing up for coverage in the new government run exchanges - so called "marketplaces" - where people have to go to get insurance coverage mandated by the Affordable Care Act.

    There is so much information many people need to know and it can be a bit complicated.

    September 29th, 2013
    This morning, we continue to highlight the ongoing celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month.

    Today we showcase Latino art at El Museo del Barrio.

    But first, an incredible Latino business boom. Nearly twice as many Latinos own their own businesses today than 11-years ago.

    A new study predicts this year there will be almost 3.2 million Hispanic-owned businesses in the country.

    That's up from nearly 1.7 million in 2002, according to the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Geoscape Projects.

    So what's behind this exciting turnaround? We're joined by Rick Miranda, President and CEO of The Brooklyn Kings County Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Carmen Rodriguez, owner of Brooklyn Cupcake.

    Links Seen on our Show

  • elmuseo.org

    September 22nd, 2013
    Happy Hispanic Heritage Month! We're in the midst of the celebration, now in its 45th year.

    We'll highlight some of the events scheduled for this annual event.

    Also, the dawn of a new political era for New York City Latinos. Three Latinos with city council seats in their sites, all winners of the Democratic primary race for New York City Council. All of them looking to make a difference in their communities.

    In the studios, we are joined by Carlos Menchaca, Antonio Reynoso and Ritchie Torres.

    Links Seen on our Show

  • www.teatroyerbabruja.org
  • www.zondelbarrio.com
  • Also, please check out ABC7's special coverage on Hispanic Heritage Month: ABC7 Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

    September 15th, 2013
    We will talk about a historic partnership agreement to protect the rights of Mexicans in the workplace here in our area.

    But first, the race for New York City mayor. Bill de Blasio finished first in the Democratic race with 40 percent of the vote. Bill Thompson getting 26 percent. On the Republican side, Joe Lhota won with 53 percent of the vote.

    Joining us this morning to talk about the mayor's race, the Latino vote and national politics affecting Latinos, are María Scharrón del Río, an Associate professor at the School of Education at Brooklyn College, and Ana Almanzar, New York Program Manager for the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, also known as NALEO.

    September 8th, 2013 (Originally aired on August 25th, 2013)
    Today, we have a special show, devoting all of Tiempo to an acting legend: Rita Moreno, the star of the silver screen, the stage and television.

    One of Moreno's best known roles was "Anita" in the groundbreaking movie "West Side Story," for which she won an Oscar.

    In the course of her career, she's also won a Tony, Grammy and two Emmys.

    Now, Ms. Moreno has put another feather in her cap; she is a New York Times bestselling author for her first book, "Rita Moreno: Memorias," available in Spanish and English.

    Here to talk about her book and her incredible career is Rita Moreno.

    September 1st, 2013
    Today we'll look at a program called HISPA that works to keep Latino children in high school and on the right track to college.

    But first, we are putting the spotlight on autism within the Latino community.

    Studies have shown Latino children are diagnosed with some form inside the autism spectrum disorder, less often and later than other toddlers.

    Now, a new study in pediatrics looks at the role the pediatrician plays in all of this.

    Links Seen on our Show

    Autism Speaks Family Services offer a number of Spanish-language resources. They include:

  • Autism Speaks Manual de los 100 Días (100 Day Tool Kit)
  • The Autism Speaks Autism Response Team en Español hotline: 888-772-9050.
  • The Autism Speaks Resource Library en Español.
  • Autism Speaks resources in other languages here.
  • hispa.org
  • "Maybe" campaign
  • 100 Day Tool Kit in Spanish - this tool kit helps parents with a newly diagnosed child get organized and figure out  what do I do first? What's next? A full course of action for the first 100 days
  • Early Access to Care
  • The Autism Speaks Autism Response Team - these services are available in Spanish.
  • Additional Spanish Resources

    August 25th, 2013
    Today, we have a special show, devoting all of Tiempo to an acting legend: Rita Moreno, the star of the silver screen, the stage and television.

    One of Moreno's best known roles was "Anita" in the groundbreaking movie "West Side Story," for which she won an Oscar.

    In the course of her career, she's also won a Tony, Grammy and two Emmys.

    Now, Ms. Moreno has put another feather in her cap; she is a New York Times bestselling author for her first book, "Rita Moreno: Memorias," available in Spanish and English.

    Here to talk about her book and her incredible career is Rita Moreno.

    August 4th, 2013
    A virtual tour of El Barrio's past and present with the help of your smartphone. We'll talk to the creative minds behind it, and when you can check it out.

    But first, Pope Francis' historic trip to Brazil and groundbreaking new stand.

    During a press conference on his flight back from Brazil, Pope Francis departed from his predecessors' remarks on gay people, telling reporters that he was not in a position to judge people based on their sexuality.

    Record-breaking crowds turned out to greet the Pontiff on his return to Latin America. As many as three million people swarmed Rio de Janiero's Copacabana Beach. The pope made it clear he plans to reenergize and radically change the church.

    I'm joined by Terrence Tilley, Chair of the Theology Department at Fordham University.

    July 21st, 2013
    We have two topics this morning, Latinos and literature. What's missing from many books?

    But first, a way for many young undocumented people to stay here legally, but few take advantage of it.

    Deferred action for childhood arrivals allows immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children to get work permits for two years, if they meet certain criteria.

    You have to be under the age of 31 and in this country as of June 15, 2012, came to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday, lived in the U.S. since June 15, 2007 until now, current students or graduates and not convicted of a serious crime.

    Joining us are Julissa Gutierrez, the Director of National Programs and Community Relations at Naleo, Indiana Porta, an attorney with the New York Legal Assistance Group and Juliana Perez Calle, who has gone through the deferred action process and is now a paralegal.

    Links Seen on our Show

    .

    July 14th, 2013 (Originally aired on June 16th, 2013) Known as the "Cathedral in the Bronx", St. Anselm Roman Catholic Church is a magnificent house of worship. However, the 120-year-old church, the spiritual home for so many latino families, is showing its age.

    A restoration project is underway, but it's an expensive project, and as you can imagine, financial help is needed. If you'd like to help donate, please call 718-585-8666. We'll show you how you can lend a helping hand to restore this artistic jewel.

    Plus, breast cancer screenings can save lives, yet not everyone has the access or resources to do it. Now, Saint Barnabas Hospital is rolling out a new mammography van. It serves low-income neighborhoods in the South Bronx - hard to reach communities where many are latina immigrants.

    We will talk with Dr. Ivette Vigoda, an oncologist at St. Barnabas Hospital and Maricel Cruz, who is in the radiology department.

    Links Seen on our Show

    July 7th, 2013
    This morning, a celebration of our culture, that will keep you on your feet.

    Some of Latin Jazz's biggest names are taking the stage for a festival right here in New York City and two of them are here in the studio with us this morning.

    You'll hear from Grammy winner Arturo O'Farrill and Tito Rodriguez, Jr. later in our program.

    June 30th, 2013
    El Diario/La Prensa marks 100 years in print, becoming the oldest Spanish language newspaper in the country.

    But first, should New York City police officers be allowed to speak Spanish on the job? This morning, an NYPD officer's speaking out.

    Jessenia Guzman says she was reprimanded for speaking Spanish while on duty.

    June 23rd, 2013 (Originally aired on May 5th, 2013)
    This week, we put the spotlight on a program helping young Latino men to shine.

    Also: Living on the brink of poverty. Twenty five percent of Latinos in New York City live in poverty according to new numbers from the Center for Economic Opportunity. That's compared to twenty one percent of all New Yorkers. Joining us to talk about the struggle and efforts to turn those numbers around is Reverend Ray Rivera, president and CEO of the Latino Pastoral Action Center, along with Ana Maria Archila, the co-executive director of Make the Road New York. And Mark Gonzalez, interim executive director of Aspira of New York.

    Links seen on our show:
    www.shp.org/GriffinBridges
    www.shp.org/BuildingBridges5k

    June 16th, 2013
    Known as the "Cathedral in the Bronx", St. Anselm Roman Catholic Church is a magnificent house of worship. However, the 120-year-old church, the spiritual home for so many latino families, is showing its age.

    A restoration project is underway, but it's an expensive project, and as you can imagine, financial help is needed. If you'd like to help donate, please call 718-585-8666. We'll show you how you can lend a helping hand to restore this artistic jewel.

    Plus, breast cancer screenings can save lives, yet not everyone has the access or resources to do it. Now, Saint Barnabas Hospital is rolling out a new mammography van. It serves low-income neighborhoods in the South Bronx - hard to reach communities where many are latina immigrants.

    We will talk with Dr. Ivette Vigoda, an oncologist at St. Barnabas Hospital and Maricel Cruz, who is in the radiology department.

    Links Seen on our Show



    June 9th, 2013
    Some renters in Harlem and the South Bronx told us they were recently asked to prove their citizenship to stay in their home. Do landlords have the right to make such a demand?

    Also, on June 13th from 8:30am-1pm, a Fair Housing Symposium will be held at the NYU School of Law on 108 West 3rd St. in Lipton Hall. Featured guests will include NYC's Department of City Planning Population Division Director Dr. Joseph Salvo, Anti-Discrimination Center's Executive Director Craig Gurian, Newark's Fair Housing Equal Opportunity Enforcement HUD Chief Frank Vespa-Papaleo and more.

    For information: 212-863-8033
    RSVP: BUCKLEYA@hpd.nyc.gov

    Links Seen on our Show



    June 2nd, 2013:
    We'll look at and celebrate the rich Latino culture, and examine a potentially groundbreaking idea gaining momentum. It's an idea that gives immigrants who are not citizens the right to vote in New York City.

    Currently, the New York City Council is weighing a proposal to allow residents who are not U.S. citizens to vote in city elections. New York would be the first major city in the country to make this change. It could impact hundreds of thousands of people and change the voter rolls of the entire city.

    Joining us to discuss the proposal are Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, Councilwoman Melissa Mark-Viverito and David Andersson, the coordinator for the New York Coalition to Expand Voting Rights.

    Links Seen on our Show



    May 19th, 2013:
    We'll put a spotlight on a local teen's inspirational success story, immigrating to America, and the people who helped him pursue his dream.

    And, more about a new partnership to strengthen Latino-owned businesses in New Jersey. The Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey has joined forces with the African-American Chamber of Commerce, and will be here to talk about the new arrangement. Joining us are Carlos Medina, the chairman of the statewide Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey, John Harmon, the president and COD of the African American Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey, and Luis Alamo, the founder and president of the Alamo Insurance Group.

    Links Seen on our Show



    May 12th, 2013:
    We shared a celebration of Mexican culture on display in Manhattan.

    Also, President Obama's trip to Latin America and what's next.

    May 5th, 2013:
    This week, we put the spotlight on a program helping young Latino men to shine.

    Also: Living on the brink of poverty. Twenty five percent of Latinos in New York City live in poverty according to new numbers from the Center for Economic Opportunity. That's compared to twenty one percent of all New Yorkers. Joining us to talk about the struggle and efforts to turn those numbers around is Reverend Ray Rivera, president and CEO of the Latino Pastoral Action Center, along with Ana Maria Archila, the co-executive director of Make the Road New York. And Mark Gonzalez, interim executive director of Aspira of New York.

    Links seen on our show:
    www.shp.org/GriffinBridges
    www.shp.org/BuildingBridges5k

    April 28th, 2013
    A milestone for Hostos Community College in the South Bronx. The college marked its 45 anniversary last week. Hostos has a rich and colorful history -- but it almost didn't survive the fiscal crisis of the 1970's. We'll talk about its past, present and future.

    Also, a few weeks ago New York Governor Andrew Cuomo launched the 'Office for New Americans.' Twenty seven so called "opportunity centers" are now open throughout the state and New York City to help immigrants pursue the American dream. We are joined by New York Cecretary of State Cesar A. Perales, who oversees this new office.

    April 21st, 2013
    A milestone for Hostos Community College in the South Bronx: It will mark its 45th anniversary on April 22nd. The school has a rich and colorful history, but almost didn't survive the fiscal crisis of the 1970's. We talk about its past and future.

    And Port Chester politics: Last month, the Westchester town re-elected a Latino to the board of trustees. The town also has a new mayor. The political scene there has changed since a federal court decided Port Chester violated the voting rights act, ruling the town's system of electing its board of trustees was unfair to Hispanic voters. Joining us will be re-elected Board of Trustee Member Luis Marino and newly-elected Mayor Neil Pagano.

    April 7th, 2013
    The road to citizenship: It's been a very important topic here on Tiempo. And as we all know, getting there can be a long and difficult process. This week, we show you how you can get help from a free and confidential hotline. The 11th annual "Citizenship NOW!" hotline is set to open at the end of the month, and Eyewitness News is a proud media partner of the event - along with the City University of New York, Univision and the New York Daily News. Joining us today to talk about how the hotline can help you is Andres Lemons, an attorney at the CUNY Express Immigration Center. Also, Emma Dyer from Panama who called the hotline back in 2011 and became an american citizen six months later.

    Plus, we'll talk to the folks behind 'Glam Belleza Latina' -- a new magazine geared towards Latinas who love fashion, beauty, gossip and culture.

    March 31, 2013
    This week on Tiempo: Showing ID to ride the subway - the battle to protect your rights. And, efforts to make the DREAM Act a reality in New York. The measure would help undocumented students pay for college. Lead sponsor Assemblyman Francisco Moya joins us with more about it.

    March 24, 2013

    David Novarro, filling in for Joe Torres, will take a look at the potential impact newly elected Pope Francis will have on the Catholic community -- especially given the fact that he is the first pontiff from the Americas and a native of Argentina. David will talk with Michael Lee, a professor and theologian at Fordham University and the president-elect of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States.

    Later on, David will take a look at new report that has been released by the Community Service Society of New York that chronicles the plight of young Mexicans trying to make a better life for themselves in the city. He'll be joined by Lazar Treschan from CCSNY and co-author of the report; and Daniel Veliz, a 20-year-old who dropped out of high school, but is now planning on studying graphic design and was able to find a job through Opportunities for a Better Tomorrow.

    March 17 2013

    Marcus Solis, filling in for Joe Torres, will take a look at the legacy left by the recent passing of Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez. Marcus will speak with Congressman Gregory Meeks, a Democrat from Queens who is a senior member of the House of Representatives' Foreign Affairs Committee. He was a member of the U.S. delegation at the Chavez's funeral service.

    Later on, Marcus will look at the GED Campaign To Finish program. With New York State scheduled to bring in a brand new test that could wipe out previous work of diploma hopefuls, there is a major push to get residents to earn their GED this year. He will be joined by Paula Gavin, the executive director of the Fund for Public Advocacy; Daron Nunez, a student now working toward earning his GED; and Karina Diaz, a case manager for "The Door."

    March 10, 2013

    Joe Torres will find out where the situation stands with creating the first national museum dedicated to the culture and history of Latinos in America by talking with Cid Wilson, who recently has been named the board chairman of the group looking to make the museum a reality.

    Plus, given that President Obama has designated January as National Mentoring Month, Joe will talk about the need for Latino mentors to help coach and guide young boys and girls in New York in particular with Hector Batista, the executive director of the Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City; and Paul Pabon, a local Big Brother.



    Tiempo: March 3rd, 2013

    Joe Torres will took a look at the future of the political climate in Cuba after Raul Castro closes out his new five-year team, which he says will be his last. Castro has already picked Miguel Diaz-Canel to be his successor. Joe will talk about this announcement and the possible implications this could have on the country with Ted Henken, a professor in the Department of Black and Latino Studies at Baruch College at the City University of New York; and Alexis Romay, an author and member of the board of directors of the human rights organization, Cuba Archive.

    Later on, Joe will take a look at the upcoming Latino College Expo taking place at New York University on March 16. He will discuss the event with Antonio Aponte, one of the expo's founders; Anthony Goenaga, a former expo attendee who is now an associate athletic trainer for the New York Knicks; and Kizzy Chalres-Guzman, the director of the climate change and public health programs at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

    Tiempo: February 24th, 2013

    The U.S. Supreme Court is on the verge of hearing a case, Shelby County Alabama v. Holder, this week that will revisit the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which bans discriminatory practices that kept so many minorities away from the polls. At stake is a part of the law that requires places with a history of discrimination to get federal approval before changing voting laws. In order to urge the court to keep the act as it stands, 22 Latino groups have filed a brief.

    Joe Torres will talk about this issue with Juan Cartagena, the president of and general counsel of LatinoJustice; Ralina Cardona, the New York State director of the League of United Latin American Citizens; and Jaime Estades, the founder of the Latino Leadership Institute.

    Tiempo: February 17th, 2013

    In the wake of Pope Benedict XVI announcement that he will step down from his duties of leading the Catholic Church at the end of the month due to health reasons, Joe Torres will take a look at the Pope's decision with Michael Lee, a professor and theologian at Fordham University, who also serves as the president-elect of the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States.

    Tiempo: February 10th, 2013

    In the wake of the passing of former New York City mayor Ed Koch, Joe Torres will take a look at his legacy within the local Latino community -- particularly in the South Bronx where he turned a highly dangerous area into a thriving community. Joe will speak with former Bronx president Fernando Ferrer and Lourdes Zapata, the senior vice president of SoBRO, the South Bronx overall economic development corporation.

    Plus, Joe will be joined by Latin jazz star Bobby Sanabria stops by before waiting to hear his name called during The Grammy Awards later in the evening. He has been nominted for Best Latin Jazz Album and Best Instrumental Arrangement.

    Tiempo: February 3rd, 2013

    Joe Torres will take a look at the immigration reform that was recently agreed upon by a bipartisan group of senators -- including Charles Schumer of New York and Robert Menendez of New Jersey. The plan follows a call for action here in New York City and also features a path to citizenship for the undocumented, improvements to legal immigration system and increased border security. Joe will break down the various aspects of the proposal with Congresswomen Nydia Velazquez from New York's 7th District, New York City council member Melissa Mark-Viverito and Javier Valdes, the co-executive director of Make The Road New York.

    Later on, given that February is Heart Awareness Month, Joe will speak to Mario Garcia -- the chief of cardiology and co-director at the Montefiore Einstein Center for Heart and Vascular Care -- about the simple lifestyle changes you can make to reduce your chance of getting heart disease by protecting it.

    Tiempo: January 27th, 2013

    As President Barack Obama enters his second term, Joe Torres will look at the many issues that the Obama Administration has prioritized that are of key concern to Latinos --such as immigration, education and jobs -- and how Obama's goals hope to address them. He will discuss this with Angelo Falcon, the president of the National Institute for Latino Policy.

    Later on, Joe will look specifically at the job market in this tough economy with Rod Colon, a career coach, author and motivational speaker. Although the national job rate stands at 7.8 percent, the rate for just Latinos is higher at 9.6 percent, according to the latest government figures.

    Tiempo: January 20th, 2013

    Joe Torres will revisit his exclusive interview with Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who still serves as the archbishop of the Archdiocese of New York. The two will talk about a wide variety of topics, ranging from immigration to education to vocations -- and what his goals are for Latino Catholics in particular and the challenges that have arisen as the Church tries to meet the spiritual needs of an ever-growing Latino population.

    Tiempo: January 13th, 2013

    Joe Torres will find out where the situation stands with creating the first national museum dedicated to the culture and history of Latinos in America by talking with Cid Wilson, who recently has been named the board chairman of the group looking to make the museum a reality.

    Plus, given that President Obama has designated January as National Mentoring Month, Joe will talk about the need for Latino mentors to help coach and guide young boys and girls in New York in particular with Hector Batista, the executive director of the Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City; and Paul Pabon, a local Big Brother.

    Tiempo: January 6th, 2013

    On a special day for the Catholic Church, Three Kings Day, Joe Torres will sit down for an exclusive interview with Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who still serves as the archbishop of the Archdiocese of New York. The two will talk about a wide variety of topics, ranging from immigration to education to vocations -- and what his goals are for Latino Catholics in particular and the challenges that have arisen as the Church tries to meet the spiritual needs of an ever-growing Latino population.

    Tiempo: December 30th, 2012

    Joe Torres will take a look at the current issues within the realm of education. Joe will take a look at the unfortunate trend of schools being forced to close. The Archdiocese of New York has announced that 26 elementary schools in New York City and the northern suburbs could close by June, which would force more than 5,000 students to relocate to other schools. Joe will speak with Ivelisse Segui, president of the parent association at Blessed Sacrament in the Bronx -- one of the at-risk Catholic schools. They will also be joined by her son, Rafael, who is a fifth grader at the school.

    Later on, Joe will take a closer look at the Mercy College Parent Center in the Bronx, which provides resources for parents of students of all ages and gives them the tools to help their own children succeed in school. He'll be joined by the center's director, Dr. Aramina Ferrera, and Yokayra Fernandez, a mother from Fordham Heights in the Bronx.

    Tiempo: December 23rd, 2012

    On the wake of the death of revered Latina vocalist Jenni Rivera or "La Diva de La Banda" as she was known by so many of her fans, Joe Torres will discuss the legacy of the 43-year-old star who died on Dec. 9 when her plane crashed in northern Mexico. Joe will discuss her legacy with Marisol Vargas, a DJ on Amor 93.1 and Daniel Leyva from the Latino Commission on AIDS, one of the many local organizations touched by Rivera's efforts.

    Later on, Joe will talk about a social media movement known as "Boricua Winter." The initiative started as the result of the vicious murder of a 32-year-old publicist named Jose Enrique Gomez in Puerto Rico, who has beaten to death by a group of attackers. Joe will talk about how his death became the tipping point for many Puerto Ricans to put an end to such violence with Cristina Costantini, a reporter with our partners at ABC News and Univision; and Pedro Julio Serrano, a New York-based human rights activist.

    Tiempo: December 9th, 2012

    In the wake of the recent passing of famed boxer Hector "Macho" Camacho, Joe Torres will sit down with the owner of Gleason's Gym, Bruce Silverglade, to talk about the New York native and three-time world champion who compiled a record of 88-6 during his career. Camacho was killed on Nov. 24 in Puerto Rico at age 50.

    Plus, Joe will take a look at the growing push to clean up the streets of Roosevelt Avenue running from Queens Boulevard to Northern Boulevard in Queens with Jose Peralta, a New York State senator who represents the 13th district.

    Tiempo: December 2nd, 2012 (originally aired on April 15, 2012)

    Joe Torres takes a look at a unique program offered at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx that allows struggling artists who can't pay for health insurance to trade their talents for treatments. Joe sits down with Iris Jimenez-Hernandez, executive director at the hospital; and artist Edith Garcia Velasquez, a participant in the program.

    Later on, Joe discusses "Hunterdon Hispanos," an organization that was founded four years ago to help unite the growing number of Latinos in Hunterdon County, N.J. Joe speaks with Coral Perez, lead attorney for the project; and Douglas Cartwright, the organization's president.

    Tiempo: November 25th, 2012

    Joe Torres will take a look at a major move that appears to make it easier for Cubans to leave the country. For years the exit visa requirement stood as a towering obstacle for Cubans looking to leave the island, but recently the country's government announced that it will drop that policy. He will talk about the issue with Mauricio Font, the director of The Bildner Center for Western Hemisphere Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York; and Remberto Perez, vice president of the Cuban American National Foundation.

    Later on, Joe will look at this year's Latino Trendsetter Awards, which will take place on Nov. 27 to honor Latinos for their positive impact in their communities. He will speak with Juan Guillen, founder and CEO of LatinTrends, and Richard Rodriguez from Laboratorio Beuna Salud. They will be co-presenting the awards this year.

    Tiempo: November 18th, 2012

    Joe Torres will take at the role that Latinos played in the recent presidential election. The demographic, which made up 10 percent of the electorate, according to national exit polls, voted for Democratic incumbent Barack Obama over Republican candidate Mitt Romney by the tune of 71 percent to 27 percent, according to the Pew Hispanic Center. Joe will discuss this data with Angelo Falcon, the president of National Institute for Latino Policy and Ralina Cardona, the New York State director for the League of United Latin American Citizens, also known as LULAC.

    Later on, Joe will talk about the ongoing efforts that the American Red Cross are undergoing in storm-ravaged sections of the city in the wake of Hurricane Sandy with Luis Avila, the chief emergency services officer of the organization's Greater New York York region and Zuellyvette Feliciano, a Red Cross volunteer.

    Tiempo: November 11th, 2012 (Orginally aired on December 11th, 2011)

    Joe Torres takes a look at the new reform programs implemented by New York City that will expand legal services for immigrant who need lawyers or are victims of domestic violence. He'll discuss this topic with Deputy Mayor of Legal Affairs Carol Robles-Roman and Mayor Bloomberg's chief policy advisor, John Feinblatt.

    Later on, Joe will talk about the Hispanic Society of America -- a jewel of a museum tucked away in Washington Heights filled with world-class art work and important manuscripts and photographs -- with the society's executive director, Mitchell Codding.

    Tiempo: October 28th, 2012

    With a little more than a week to Election Day, Joe Torres goes one-on-one with two men running alongside the candidates in the race to be the governor of Puerto Rico. First, Joe will speak first with Rafael Cox Alomar, a lawyer who is running with Democratic candidate Alejandro Garcia Padilla, as he seeks the office of resident commissioner.

    Later on, Joe will talk with Kenneth McClintock, the Secretary of State, who is doing all he can to make sure that Republican incumbent Luis Fortuno remains in office.

    Tiempo: October 21st, 2012

    With just more than two weeks to go before Election Day, Joe Torres will be joined by Sila Maria Calderon, the who served as governor of Puerto Rico from 2001 to 2005. She was the first -- and currently only -- woman to hold the position in Puerto Rico. She will talk to Joe about the charitable work she has done through a foundation in her name and the future of Puerto Rico.

    Later on, Joe will look at the HIV/AIDs epidemic that has been disproportionately affecting the Latino community for years. More than 200,000 Latinos in the U.S. and Puerto Rico are living with the disease -- and according to the CDC Latinos accounted for 20 percent of new HIV infections in 2009 in spite of all representing 16 percent of the U.S. population. Joe will be joined by Guillermo Chacon, the president of Latino Commission on AIDs; and Joseph Rivera, co-founder of Baila Society and Bailando Por Una Causa.

    Tiempo: Sunday, October 7th, 2012

    On Election Day, Nov. 6, voters on Puerto Rico will face a big decision as they go to the polls and cast ballots on whether to change the isalnd's status as a territory of the U.S -- and decide which option they prefer for the future. Joe Torres will take a look at the various options with Frances Negron-Muntaner, the directory of the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race at Columbia University.

    Later on, with the annual Tour de Bronx slated to take place on Oct. 14, Joe finds out more about the event-- and the important role it plays in the surrounding community -- with Olga Tirado, who serves as one of the event organizers as well as the executive director the Bronx Tourism Council, and Dr. Maria Rodriguez, an interventional cardiologist with Montefiore Medical Center.

    Sunday, September 30th, 2012

    In the wake of the shooting death of Jamil Bader Jr, -- who was gunned down working at his family's bodega on Clinton Avenue in Newark -- Joe Torres will sit down with the national head of the Bodega Association of the U.S., Fernando Mateo, who recently met with Newark Mayor Cory Booker to discuss new ways to product bodega owners.

    Also, Joe will look at the recent announcement of Hispanic food giant Goya planning to break ground on a new $127 million facility in Jersey City  and what economic impact the new plant will have when it opens in the spring of 2014. He will be joined by the company's president, Robert Unanue, and his brother and executive vice president, Peter Unanue, as well as Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy.

    Sunday, September 23rd, 2012

    With Election Day around the corner on Nov. 6, Joe Torres takes a look at the biggest issue in the minds of many Latinos: the troubled economy. Recently, AARP did a survey that focused on Latino voters older than 50. The top issues that came up included prices rising faster than income, paying too much in taxes and not having enough financial security to retire. He will be joined by Yvette Martinez, the associate state director of New York for AARP; and Jose Calderon, the president of the Hispanic Federation.

    Later on with Hispanic Heritage Month in full bloom, Joe will find out more about the "fiesta" taking place in celebration of Latino culture at The Metropolitan Museum of Art with Donna Williams, the museum's chief audience development officer; and Jackie Terrassa, the museum's managing educator for gallery and studio programs.

    Sunday, September 16th, 2012 (Originally aired on December 11th, 2011)

    Joe Torres takes a look at the new reform programs implemented by New York City that will expand legal services for immigrant who need lawyers or are victims of domestic violence. He'll discuss this topic with Deputy Mayor of Legal Affairs Carol Robles-Roman and Mayor Bloomberg's chief policy advisor, John Feinblatt.

    Later on, Joe will talk about the Hispanic Society of America -- a jewel of a museum tucked away in Washington Heights filled with world-class art work and important manuscripts and photographs -- with the society's executive director, Mitchell Codding.

    Sunday, September 9th, 2012

    Joe Torres looks at the growing trend of Salvadorans living in the New York area. According to U.S. Census data, there are approximately 200,000 people who originate from El Salvador and now call the tri-state area home. In fact, there is a consulate on Long Island -- the local epicenter -- where hundreds of Salvadorans are greeted each week. Joe will be joined by Edgar Mauricio Vasquez, the vice consul for the Consulate General of El Salvador on Long Island; and Giovanni Mata, the past president and current advisor to the Suffolk County Hispanic Advisory Board.

    Later on, Joe will sit down with Felipe Gomez, the co-owner of New Legend Boxing in Ozark Park in Queens. Gomez had worked for the NYPD for 18 years before using the boxing ring as a vehicle to help young people realize their dreams, while working to improve their relationship with police.

    Sunday, September 2nd, 2012

    Joe Torres will look at the topic of what is known as "deferred action" as many undocumented immigrants look for a temporary reprieve in the U.S. from deportation following the executive order from President Obama that made it all possible. Thousands of Latinos have already applied in New York City alone. Joe will be joined by Kathleen Almanzar, the director of the Office of Immigrant Initiatives with the NYC Department of Youth and Community Development; and Natalia Aristizabal, a youth organizer at Make The Road New York.

    Later on, Joe will explore a new "election protection smartphone app" that has been designed to educate votes about the voting process and makes sure they have the needed resources and tools to cast their ballots come Election Day. The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, also known as NALEO, has estimated that about 12.2 million Hispanic voters will make their way to the ballot boxes in November. Joining Joe to talk about the app will be Ana Almanzar, NALEO's New York program manger of civic engagement; and Cesar Fernandez, an attorney and member of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC); and Ralina Cardona, the New York state director of LULAC.

    Sunday, August 26th, 2012 (Originally aired on April 15th, 2012)

    Joe Torres takes a look at a unique program offered at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx that allows struggling artists who can't pay for health insurance to trade their talents for treatments. Joe sits down with Iris Jimenez-Hernandez, executive director at the hospital; and artist Edith Garcia Velasquez, a participant in the program.

    Later on, Joe discusses "Hunterdon Hispanos," an organization that was founded four years ago to help unite the growing number of Latinos in Hunterdon County, N.J. Joe speaks with Coral Perez, lead attorney for the project; and Douglas Cartwright, the organization's president.

    Sunday, August 19th, 2012 (Originally aired on July 22nd, 2012)

    Filling in for Joe Torres, David Novarro will discuss the increase in shootings in New York City -- particularly in the Latino and African-American communities. In one week alone, 77 people were shot -- and 96 percent of the victims are from the minority community. Furthermore, shootings are up 12 percent in the city compared to last year.

    While examining a few cases using the coverage of the Eyewitness News team, David will speak with New York City councilwoman Melissa Mark-Viverito, who represents East Harlem and Manhattan's Upper West Side, plus the Mott Haven section of The Bronx.

    Sunday, August 12th, 2012

    Carolina Leid will look at a new initiative started up by the Manhattan District Attorney's office to reach to Latin American consuls in New York to open a dialogue among the consulates, the immigrants they represent and local law enforcement in regards to making Latinos feel more comfortable reporting crime to the NYPD. She will be joined by Manhattan Chief Assistant District Attorney Daniel R. Alonso.

    Later on, with the Democratic and Republican national conventions around the corner, Carolina will take a look at what Latinos can expect as delegates from both parties. Joining her will be Cid Wilson, a Democratic delegate from New Jersey; and Ruben Estrada, an alternate delegate from New York who also serves as the chairman of the New York State chapter of the Latino National Republican Coalition.

    Sunday, August 5th, 2012

    Carolina Leid will take a look at one of the possible unintended consequences of President Obama's new health care law -- the financial strain that could be put on hospitals across the country, and the negative impact on illegal immigrants in particular. Joining her to talk about the issue will be Alan Aviles, president and CEO of New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation and Wendy Goldstein, president and CEO of Lutheran HealthCare in Sunset Park in Brooklyn.

    Later on, Carolina will discuss a growing area initiative to teach children to swim -- especially Latino and African-American children -- among various local and national organizations, including the YMCA and the NYC Parks Department. She will be joined by Lori Rose Benson, vice president for New York City's YMCA and Christine Aleman, aquatics director of the Bronx YMCA.

    Sunday, July 29th, 2012

    In the wake of the National Day of Action for Workers' Rights and Fair Wages on July 24, Carolina Leid will take a look at the initiative in New York State to raise minimum wage and for paid sick days. She will be joined by New York State senator Gustavo Rivera -- whose 33rd District in the Northwest Bronx has a median annual income of of about $25,000 -- and Camille Rivera, executive director of United New York, a local coalition that focuses on income equality.

    Later on, Carolina will examine the national reading program "Reach Out and Read," which promotes literary skills in young children. Studies have shown an achievement gaps in literacy among minorities, particularly immigrant Latinos in the U.S. To close the gap, a special Latino-focused program was been created: "Leyendo Juntos" (Reading Together). She will speak with Traci Lester, the executive director of Reach Out and Read of Greater New York; Dr. Sandra Braganza, pediatrician at The Children's Hospital at Montefiore; and Marie Betancourt, a parent involved with the program.

    Sunday, July 22nd, 2012

    Filling in for Joe Torres, David Novarro will discuss the increase in shootings in New York City -- particularly in the Latino and African-American communities. In one week alone, 77 people were shot -- and 96 percent of the victims are from the minority community. Furthermore, shootings are up 12 percent in the city compared to last year.

    While examining a few cases using the coverage of the Eyewitness News team, David will speak with New York City councilwoman Melissa Mark-Viverito, who represents East Harlem and Manhattan's Upper West Side, plus the Mott Haven section of The Bronx.

    Sunday, July 15th, 2012 (Originally aired on Jan. 22nd, 2012)

    Joe Torres will look into New York state's new Mobile Legal Help Center -- the state's first roving law office and civil courtroom -- with Yisroel Schulman, president of The New York Legal Assistance Group; and Orestes Rodriguez, the executive chief clerk for New York City Courts. The center is making it easier for Hispanics and other minorities to get legal advice, counsel and representation -- and it's free.

    Plus, Joe will sit down with Grammy-winning flute player Dave Valentin, a South Bronx native who went on to become a Latin music sensation, having recorded more than 15 albums during his career.

    Sunday, July 8th, 2012 (Originally aired on May 13th, 2012)

    Joe Torres will look at the recent like of migration from Mexico with Barnard College professor Jose Moya and Ana Chireno from Make the Road New York, an organization that fights for immigrants and low-income New Yorkers. According to a recent research from the Pew Hispanic Center, the migration has not only stopped -- it may have reversed.

    Later on, Joe will sit down with Quiara Alegria Hudes, who recently won a Pulitzer Prize for her play, "Water by the Spoonful." The play centers around an Iraqi War veteran who confronts isolation by forming bonds with people he meets in an online chatroom. In addition, Hudes also wrote the book for the Broadway show "In the Heights," which went on to win a Tony for best musical in 2008.

    Sunday, July 1st, 2012 (Originally aired on April 15th, 2012)

    Joe Torres takes a look at a unique program offered at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx that allows struggling artists who can't pay for health insurance to trade their talents for treatments. Joe sits down with Iris Jimenez-Hernandez, executive director at the hospital; and artist Edith Garcia Velasquez, a participant in the program.

    Later on, Joe discusses "Hunterdon Hispanos," an organization that was founded four years ago to help unite the growing number of Latinos in Hunterdon County, N.J. Joe speaks with Coral Perez, lead attorney for the project; and Douglas Cartwright, the organization's president.

    June 24th, 2012

    President Obama's recent executive order on immigration recently made waves within the Latino community. Under the new policy, illegal immigrants will not have to fear deportation as they:

    • Are under 30-years-old and brought to the U.S. before they turned 16.
    • Has lived in the U.S. for five years.
    • Is going to school or has graduated.
    • Has no criminal record.
    Joe Torres will take a look at the topic with Ana Maria Archila, a representative from the immigrant rights organization Make The Road New York; Antonio Alarcon, a student at Flushing (N.Y.) High School who has been in the U.S. for five years and Francisco Curiel, who just has been in the country for five years and well and just finished his first year of college at Onandaga Community College.

    June 17th, 2012

    On this Father's Day edition, Joe Torres will take a look at Opportunities For A Better Tomorrow, a non-profit organization that is dedicated to finding suitable employment for Latino and African-American kids from low-income neighborhoods -- and its focus is corporate America. Evelyn Ortiz, the organization's youth coordinator, and Yaritza Muniz, a program participant, will join Joe to discuss.

    Also, Joe will talk about Teatro Stage Fest, an event that showcases some of the best performers of New York City's Latono theater scene with guests artists from Latin America, the Caribbean and Spain. Joe will talk about the festival, which runs through June 25th, with curator Susana Tubert and Pep Munoz, an actor in one of the featured plays, "39 Defaults."

    June 10th, 2012

    Joe Torres will discuss the new CUNY Institute of Mexican Studies based at Lehman College in the Bronx -- where 43 percent of the students are Latinos. He will be joined by the institutes acting director, Alyshia Galvez, and Marlen Fernandez, a sophomore at the college.

    Later on, Joe takes a look at the recent endeavors of the Fresh Air Fund, an organization that allows inner city children to experience the wonders of the outdoors by staying with volunteer host families or at its own camps. It has served more than 1.7 million children since its founding. Joe chats with Jenny Morgenthau, the organization's executive director; Leibniz Scottborgh, the director of the Father Bellini Association in Corona, Queens; and Karen Arevalo, a Corona, Queens native who has been participating in the program for three years.

    June 3rd, 2012

    With the National Puerto Rican Day Parade only a week away, Joe Torres will take a look at what the tens of thousands of marchers and millions of spectators will have to look forward to this year as the parade makes its way down Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. He'll discuss all of the festivities with Madelyn Lugo, the parade's chairperson; and Grand Marshal Dr. Felix Matos-Rodriguez, the president of Hostos Community College.

    Later on, Joe will take a look of the efforts of the City Parks Foundation, a non-profit group with a goal of getting kids from low-income households to bond with nature and expose them to outdoor classrooms. He will be joined by Claudia Demegret, the foundation's director of education; and Alexandra Hodges, who has participated with the group since the summer of 2010.

    May 20th, 2012

    Joe Torres will take a look at the new bill that was passed overwhelmingly by the New York Assembly. It's called the DREAM Fund, and it might be the next best thing to much talked about DREAM Act, as it would create a privately financed scholarship fund to help the children of undocumented immigrants pay for college tuition. Joe will talk about this topic with our own ABC7 education reporter Art McFarland, Jesus Perez, the director of academic advisement at Brooklyn College; and Cesar Ventura, a sophomore at the school.

    Later on, Joe will take a look at La Marqueta in East Harlem, a bakery that where Latino women -- among other immigrants -- are given not just jobs, but the skills to possibly one day open up their own businesses. Joe will be joined by Jessamyn Rodriguez, the founder of Hot Bread Kitchen and Antonia Garcia, who started out as a baker and now works as a production manager.

    May 13th, 2012

    Joe Torres will look at the recent like of migration from Mexico with Barnard College professor Jose Moya and Ana Chireno from Make the Road New York, an organization that fights for immigrants and low-income New Yorkers. According to a recent research from the Pew Hispanic Center, the migration has not only stopped -- it may have reversed.

    Later on, Joe will sit down with Quiara Alegria Hudes, who recently won a Pulitzer Prize for her play, "Water by the Spoonful." The play centers around an Iraqi War veteran who confronts isolation by forming bonds with people he meets in an online chatroom. In addition, Hudes also wrote the book for the Broadway show "In the Heights," which went on to win a Tony for best musical in 2008.

    May 6th, 2012

    Joe Torres will tackle the issue of immigration reform -- a topic that President Obama declared would be a "top priority" in his first year in the Oval Office. Four years later, though, many consider that to be a broken promise. Joe will sit down and discuss this issue with Angelo Falcon from the National Institute for Latino Policy and Lucia Gomez-Jimenez with La Fuente, A Tri-State Worker & Community Fund.

    Plus, Joe will look at ways to save money this summer on energy bills by sitting down with Joe Guarinello with Heartshare, Michael Ruiz with National Grid and Jennifer Rodriguez from Con Edison.

    April 29th, 2012

    Joe Torres will take a look at "Boricuas for a Positive Image," a group that is working to eliminate negative stereotypes about Puerto Ricans. Joe will be joined by the organizations founders, Julio Pabon and Lucky Rivera.

    Later on, Joe will highlight all of the amenities that the Queens Library System provides its Latino members -- including a has Facebook page entirely in Spanish. Joe will talk with Loida Garcia-Febo, the coordinator for the New Americans program; and Manuel Figueroa, assistant director of the community library.

    Sunday, April 22nd, 2012

    Joe Torres will discuss the new "compete to win" initiatives that have been set up by the New York City Department of Small Business Services that can help minority businesses get city contracts, and those more experience and clients. Joining him will be Cas Holloway, the city's new deputy mayor of operations; and a successful minority business owners, Edward Arias, president of U. Arias Corp.
    Later on, Joe will profile the work of The Boys Club of New York, an organization that has been allowing young men to reach their full potential for more than 130 years. Currently, the club serves more than 4,000 boys at three clubhouses in the city. Joe will be joined by club representative Antonio Aponte and two graduates of boarding schools -- Michael Agosto and Darwin Bernandez -- about the independent boarding school fair that the club will sponsor on May 3 to help get Latino students into prestigious boarding schools.

    Sunday, April 15th, 2012

    Joe Torres takes a look at a unique program offered at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx that allows struggling artists who can't pay for health insurance to trade their talents for treatments. Joe sits down with Iris Jimenez-Hernandez, executive director at the hospital; and artist Edith Garcia Velasquez, a participant in the program.

    Later on, Joe discusses "Hunterdon Hispanos," an organization that was founded four years ago to help unite the growing number of Latinos in Hunterdon County, N.J. Joe speaks with Coral Perez, lead attorney for the project; and Douglas Cartwright, the organization's president.

    Sunday, April 8th 2012 (Originally aired on Dec. 18, 2011)

    Joe Torres looks into how low-income New Yorkers -- including Latinos -- have been affected by the poor economy and the job crisis by talking with Nancy Rankin, vice president of policy and advocacy for the Community Service Society; and David Jones, the company's president and CEO. Recently, the organization came out with its annual survey, "The Unheard Third," which has given a better perspective on the hardships and challenges that low-income families have to face each day.

    Later on, Joe will look at the need for Brooklyn's Maura Clarke-Ita Ford Center to find a new home. For more than 18 years, the center has helped Latina women in Bushwick make better lives for themselves by teaching them English and job skills. Joining Joe to talk about the center will be Janet Henriquez-Marcic, the center's executive director; and Provi Castro, a student at the center who has raised money for its upkeep.

    Sunday, April 1st, 2012

    Joe Torres will share the critical role Latinos will play in the upcoming elections. He'll have information on two Hispanic groups that have partnered with LULAC, the League of United Latin American Citizens, to get out the vote. Their effort is called "Latinos for democracy," part of "Movimiento Hispano," that educates voters about key issues and helps Latino immigrants become citizens. Torres will be joined by Ralina Cardona, the New York State Director of LULAC, to talk about the push to register voters.

    Later on, Torres will speak to Maria Teresa Feliciano, president of the Dominican American National Roundtable; and David Birdsell, dean of Baruch College School of Public Affairs, to talk about the topic of redistricting. The changing demographics have led to a push for a new district that properly represents the growing Latino population. While the map was redrawn last week, it did not create a new district. Instead, it has enlarged an existing one increasing the number of latino constituents. This will play a big role in whether or not another Latino is voted into Congress.

    Sunday, March 25th, 2012 (Originally aired on Sunday, Feb. 26th, 2012)

    Filling in for Joe Torres, Carolina Leid will share how to get free help for filing income taxes. She'll have information on Vita -- a program created by Baruch College that provides free tax preps and filing for those of limited means throughout New York City. Carolina will be joined by Juanita Ayala Vargas, vice president of investment at United Way New York City. She also will speak with Teresa Jaramillo, who got tax help from the "My Free Taxes" program, and Dennis Wang, a student at Baruch who is president of a volunteer income tax assistance program.

    Later on, Carolina will speak to Anna Maria Chávez, who has been appointed the new CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA. Chávez will speak on the goal of getting more Latinas to sign-up to prepare as the next generation of women leaders.

    Sunday, March 18th, 2012 (Originally aired on Sunday, Jan. 22nd, 2012)

    Joe Torres will look into New York state's new Mobile Legal Help Center -- the state's first roving law office and civil courtroom -- with Yisroel Schulman, president of The New York Legal Assistance Group; and Orestes Rodriguez, the executive chief clerk for New York City Courts. The center is making it easier for Hispanics and other minorities to get legal advice, counsel and representation -- and it's free.

    Plus, Joe will sit down with Grammy-winning flute player Dave Valentin, a South Bronx native who went on to become a Latin music sensation, having recorded more than 15 albums during his career.

    Sunday, March 11, 2012 (Originally aired Dec. 4th, 2011)

    Joe Torres will address the issue of depression within the Latino community with Dr. Jane Delgado, the author of a new book, "The Buena Salud Guide to Overcoming Depression and Enjoying Life." According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in eight Hispanics report being depressed -- with a third of them reporting major symptoms.

    Then, Joe will talk to the executive director of the Puerto Rico Tourism Company, Mario González-Lafuente, about how Puerto Rico has become the "hot spot" in the Caribbean.

    Sunday, March 4th, 2012

    Joe Torres will share how to find the right college for your child. He'll discuss the big push being made to make sure Latino students not only get into college, but graduate. Joe will show you how the Latino College Expo can make finding the right school a much easier process. For 21 years, the expo has been providing students with resources and contacts for participating colleges at a one-day event at New York University. This year it will be held on Saturday, March 17th. He will speak with Antonio Aponte, one of the expo's founders, and Alexander Bennett, a graduate of NYU who attended the expo in 2004.

    Later on, Joe will speak to Ronaldo Vega, the director of design for the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. Vega will speak on his instrumental design of the museum and his mission to commemorate the lives of Latinos who died on September 11th through the "Call to Remember" archive. The archive can also be accessed by calling (866) 582-5613.

    Sunday, Feb. 26th, 2012

    Filling in for Joe Torres, Carolina Leid will share how to get free help for filing income taxes. She'll have information on Vita -- a program created by Baruch College that provides free tax preps and filing for those of limited means throughout New York City. Carolina will be joined by Juanita Ayala Vargas, vice president of investment at United Way New York City. She also will speak with Teresa Jaramillo, who got tax help from the "My Free Taxes" program, and Dennis Wang, a student at Baruch who is president of a volunteer income tax assistance program.

    Later on, Carolina will speak to Anna Maria Chávez, who has been appointed the new CEO of Girl Scouts of the USA. Chávez will speak on the goal of getting more Latinas to sign-up to prepare as the next generation of women leaders.

    Sunday, Feb. 19th, 2012

    Filling in for Joe Torres, Carolina Leid will take a look at the Occupy Wall Street Español group and its mission of getting more Latinos to rise up and make their voices heard. She'll be joined by Mariano Munoz, one of the group's first members.

    Later on, Carolina will speak with Dr. Ana Yonlanda Ramos-Zayas, the first Latin American Studies endowed chair at Baruch College. The chair was established last semester as a means of bringing more awareness to the richness of Latin culture and the accomplishments of its people.

    Sunday, Feb. 12th, 2012 (Originally aired on Dec. 11th, 2011)

    Joe Torres takes a look at the new reform programs implemented by New York City that will expand legal services for immigrant who need lawyers or are victims of domestic violence. He'll discuss this topic with Deputy Mayor of Legal Affairs Carol Robles-Roman and Mayor Bloomberg's chief policy advisor, John Feinblatt.

    Later on, Joe will talk about the Hispanic Society of America -- a jewel of a museum tucked away in Washington Heights filled with world-class art work and important manuscripts and photographs -- with the society's executive director, Mitchell Codding.

    Sunday, Feb. 5th, 2012

    Joe Torres sits down with Josh Lockwood, the executive director of Habitat for Humanity in New York, and Ricardo Vasquez, a future homeowner who found a house in Brownsville, to discuss the renovations of living spaces for low-income people throughout the five boroughs.

    Also, Joe talks with Jose Calderon, from the Hispanic Federation, and Cynthia Rivera Weissblum from the Edwin Gould Foundation, about the Lumina Foundation. The organization is committed to enrolling and graduating students from college, especially within the Latino community. Those intersted in calling the Hispanic Federation hotline can do so by dialing (866) 432-9832.

    Sunday, Jan. 29th, 2012 (Originally aired on Oct. 16th, 2011)

    Joe Torres sits down with Elizabeth Yeampierre, the executive director of an organization called UPROSE (United Puerto Rican Organization of Sunset Park). Yeampierre was recently recognized for all her efforts by receiving the 2011 VIDA Award from the National Alliance for Hispanic Health.

    Also, Joe talks with Albie Hecht, the executive producer of a new documentary, "The Harvest (La Cosecha)," that chronicles the stories of young children farmhands who work long hours in America in sweltering conditions to support their families, many of whom immigrated from Central and South America.

    Sunday, Jan. 22nd, 2012

    Joe Torres will look into New York state's new Mobile Legal Help Center -- the state's first roving law office and civil courtroom -- with Yisroel Schulman, president of The New York Legal Assistance Group; and Orestes Rodriguez, the executive chief clerk for New York City Courts. The center is making it easier for Hispanics and other minorities to get legal advice, counsel and representation -- and it's free.

    Plus, Joe will sit down with Grammy-winning flute player Dave Valentin, a South Bronx native who went on to become a Latin music sensation, having recorded more than 15 albums during his career.

    Sunday, Jan. 15th, 2012 (Originally aired on Oct. 30th, 2011)

    After attending a recent Hispanic community action summit organized by the Obama Administration, Joe Torres sits down to talk about what can be done to help local businesses gain an edge during the recession with Jorge Silva-Puras from the U.S. Small Business Administration. Later, Joe and Silva-Puras will be joined by Frank Garcia, the chairman of the New York State Coalition of Hispanic Chambers of Commerce; and Vladimir Reynoso, a small business owner who is CEO of a minority-owned green company that helps businesses throughout the city through more energy-efficient methods.

    Later on, Joe talks with Guillermo Chacon, the president of the Latino Commission on AIDS, which is dedicated to fighting the spread of HIV and AIDS.

    Sunday, Jan. 8th, 2012

    Joe Torres talks about the difficulties of getting Latino students into a specialized high school by speaking with two representatives from Science Schools Initiative, an organization that strives to raise diversity at elite NYC public schools through tutoring. Joining him are Michael Mascetti, the organization's executive director; and Sam Hausner-Levine, a tutor in the program.

    Later on, Joe will focus on the increased mainstream exposure to Latino art by talking with Leah Dickerman, curator of The Museum of Modern Art -- where an exhibit for famed Mexican muralist Diego Rivera is currently being shown -- and Deborah Cullen, curator with El Museo Del Barrio.

    Sunday, Jan. 1st, 2012 (Originally aired on Nov. 20th, 2011)

    Joe Torres will again examine the issue of Latino immigrants learning English as a second language. New York State recently approved a plan for NYC schools to provide more support and choices for students and their families who learning English. He'll discuss that plan with state education commissioner John B. King Jr. and Ysidro Abreu, principal and founder of M.S. 319 in Washington Heights -- a school where English is the second language for many students.

    Later on, Joe will talk about the importance of getting an annual flu shot -- given how the low percentage of Latinos who get vaccinated -- with Dr. Luis Rodriguez, the official doctor of the American Lung Association's "Faces of Influenza" campaign; and Ramona Cruz, a 75-year-old grandmother and great-grandmother who works to spread awareness of getting vaccinated to fellow seniors.


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