Eyewitness News

Here and Now

Friday, April 18, 2014
Here and Now on April 13th, 2014: Part 1 Here and Now on April 13th, 2014: Part 2 Here and Now on April 13th, 2014: Part 3 Here and Now on April 13th, 2014: Part 4 Here and Now on April 6th, 2014: Part 1

A weekly one hour program, airing on Channel 7, that's dedicated to covering the issues and interests of the African-American community in the New York tri-state area.

THIS WEEK on Here and Now: April 20th, 2014 (Originally aired on September 29th, 2013)
Coming up, it's a disease that affects one out of every 500 African American births. As we join efforts this month to educate the public about Sickle Cell Anemia, members of a local family share their story of crisis and courage.

Also ahead, we're celebrating "Africa Month" with a look at the first ever public exhibit of a one-of- kind collection of African artifacts assembled over 40 years.

And the author of "The Bald Mermaid," Interior Designer Sheila Bridges, shares her deeply personal story of how losing her hair changed everything.

Plus, a sneak peek at the engaging documentary, "Little Ballers." It follows several young basketball players who are driven to scoring big.

And who says only the guys can play the field? We'll meet champion, tackle football player, Adrienne Smith.

But first, despite a national decline in foreclosures in our area, many homeowners, especially in Brooklyn, are in still in danger of losing their homes.

Here this afternoon to offer some advise is Trisha Ocona Francis, a licensed real estate broker and member of the New York State Department of State's Real Estate Board.

Recently on Here and Now: April 13th, 2014
Coming up, you may as well call it a modern day form of slavery: the trafficking of children and women. One survivor shares her story and her determination to save others in a new book.

Later, backstage with Denzel Washington and the cast from the Broadway production of "Raisin in the Sun." Also, a conversation with the Tony award-nominated Director, Kenny Leon.

But first, Rev. Al Sharpton recently admitted wearing a wire and secretly recording conversations with members of the mob. While he admits to working with the feds, he denies ever getting paid for it.

April 6th, 2014
It has been exactly 20 years since the Rwanda Genocide, when almost a million minority Tutsis were slaughtered by the Hutu majority. Today, we'll meet one of the survivors who started a support group for millions of Rwandan orphans.

Plus, the Balm of Gilead organization committed to improving the health of people in community--celebrates its 25th anniversary of "The National Week of Prayer for the Healing of Aids."

Later, an upcoming benefit concert to help raise funds for the Uniondale High School Show Choir heads to a national competition!

March 30th, 2014 (Originally aired on February 16th, 2014)
Coming up, with one out of three New Yorkers struggling to buy food, cuts to food stamp benefits in the just-passed federal farm bill could be devastating. We'll talk about the impact with the CEO of United Way of New York City.

And, we'll continue our celebration of Black History Month with a look at the legacy of the first black woman elected to Congress: Shirley Chisholm.

Later, "The Black Dress Exhibit" at Pratt, showcasing black designers. Plus, a website that gives parents the chance to shop for discounted designer clothes for kids with a celebrity pedigree.

But first, we're turning our attention to the recent controversy surrounding a Black History Month assignment at a school in Queens. Teachers told students they couldn't write about Civil Rights Activist Malcolm X because he was " too violent."

March 23rd, 2014
Coming up, as we celebrate Women's History Month, we've got a show filled with dynamic women, doing it their way.

We'll introduce you to the head of the nation's oldest minority and woman-owned design and construction firm, and we'll meet one of New York state's most dedicated and effective public servants.

Later, radio and theater icon, Vy Higginson, talks about her new musical, "Alive!"

But first, this afternoon we want to take a minute to pay our condolences to the loved ones of the eight people who died when a gas explosion leveled two buldings in east harlem.

Federal investigators have discovered a gas main leak near the site of the deadly blast, but it has not been identified as the cause. The National Transportation Safety Board has said it will not issue any findings about the cause of the exposion until much further along in its investigation.

However, there are already lawsuits and questions about who is to blame, and how much of a factor was the city's aging infrastructure.

March 16th, 2014
Coming up, one group's mission to help low income defendants post bail instead of spending time in jail trying to prove their innocence in the backlogged criminal court.

Also ahead, a look at one of the most painful diseases affecting some women, Endometriosis: the signs and symptoms. <pL Later, preserving the legacy of the great Louis Armstrong at a museum in Queens. And, we'll introduce you to a hair industry power couple that's using their business success to help save babies in Africa.

But first this afternoon, the debate over charter schools. Mayor Bill de Blasio and Governor Andrew Cuomo have taken slightly different positions on the issue.

March 9th, 2014
Coming up, as the nationwide debate over same sex marriage continues, we take a look at the issue and the differing opinions in the African American community.

Also ahead, a successful program for at-risk youngsters. How "Friends of the Children" is breaking the cycle of poverty, abuse and academic failure.

But first, "My Brother's Keeper"-- President Obama's just-announced new initiative to address the challenges facing young black men. As he unveiled the 200 million dollar program at the White House, Mr. Obama used his own personal misteps to underline the importance of giving every child the ability to meet their potential.

March 2nd, 2014
We're taking your career to the next level with top executives who are eager and ready to offer advice on getting the job or promotion you deserve!

We'll meet the CEO of MZM Construction Company in Newark, New Jersey and a top executive from Morgan Stanley, plus an Essence Magazine editor, who is eager to share a "get ahead game plan" for your career!

But first, Kenneth Morris, Jr. is a descendant of two of the most notable African Americans in our history books.

He is the three tines, great-grandson of Frederick Douglas and great-great grandson of Booker T. Washington. And, this afternoon Kenneth Morris, founder and president of the Frederick Douglas Family Initiatives, is here to talk about the continued efforts of his family.

February 23rd, 2014
Coming up, we continue our Black History Month celebration with a walk down memory lane with Apollo Theater Historian, Billy Mitchell.

Plus, the woman behind of "Because Of Them We Can," a collection of inspiring photos of children posing as African American leaders, activists and celebrities - past and present.

And later, reviving Minton's Playhouse, a jazz mecca in Harlem, dating back to the 1930's. we'll tell you about the upcoming event, "Our History, Our Music."

But first, for decades the United Negro College Fund, the nation's largest provider of scholarships and other educational support to minority and low-income students, has lived up to its slogan, "A mind is a terrible thing to waste." In fact, more than 400,000 students have earned degrees with the help of the college fund.

This year, UNCF is celebrating its 70th anniversary. With us today is Fred Mitchell, vice president of development for the UNCF.

February 16th, 2014
Coming up, with one out of three New Yorkers struggling to buy food, cuts to food stamp benefits in the just-passed federal farm bill could be devastating. We'll talk about the impact with the CEO of United Way of New York City.

And, we'll continue our celebration of Black History Month with a look at the legacy of the first black woman elected to Congress: Shirley Chisholm.

Later, "The Black Dress Exhibit" at Pratt, showcasing black designers. Plus, a website that gives parents the chance to shop for discounted designer clothes for kids with a celebrity pedigree.

But first, we're turning our attention to the recent controversy surrounding a Black History Month assignment at a school in Queens. Teachers told students they couldn't write about Civil Rights Activist Malcolm X because he was " too violent."

February 9th, 2014
Coming up, we continue our celebration of Black History Month with an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society that puts a spotlight on the unknown leaders of the borough's anti-slavery movement.

Also, a look at one of the first prominent African American communities in New York City, Seneca Village and how the creation of Central Park nearly erased its very existence.

Later, a new play that takes on addiction, adultery and forgiveness. We'll meet some of the cast from "I Don't Know Why He Loves Me."

But first, community reaction to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's decision not only settling a lawsuit over the NYPD's stop-and-frisk practices, but also agreeing to reforms.

February 2nd, 2014
Coming up, as we celebrate Black History Month, we'll take a closer look at one organization keeping the memory of a real African American hero alive. The Jackie Robinson Foundation has been passing on the legendary player's principals for 40 years, through college scholarships and now thru a new museum nearing completion.

We'll also take a look at "College Goal New York," a public service project focused on helping college-bound students and their parents figure out the daunting financial aid application process.

And later, one of New York's favorite actors, Malik Yoba, joins us here in the studio to talk about his latest role.

But first, as we begin a month long celebration of African-American history, it's important to note how it all got started.

In 1926, Carter G. Woodson, a historian, who founded the Journal of Negro History, created a Negro History Week. It was designated for the second week in February to coincide with marking the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

The week of recognition became accepted and has been extended as the full month of February, now known as Black History Month. With us this afternoon, historian, Dr. Khalil Muhammad, Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

January 26th, 2014
Coming up, an examination of race and privilege in this country. The National Black Theater dives into the often painful subject on stage with "Facing our Truth: 10 Minute Plays on Trayvon, Race and Privilege."

But first, financier and philanthropist Frank Savage tells how he navigated a successful career.

And later, it's faith and football! We'll tell you about a super gospel celebration coming right alongside the Super Bowl!

January 19th, 2014
Coming up, a look at the ethnic cleansing crisis in Dominican Republic involving Haitians and their decendants who are being forced out of the country.

Plus, an interview with Dr. Rudy Crew, former New York City chancellor and now, president of Medgar Evers College; he'll share his plans to help students reach their higher education goals.

And, one of the few elite female African Americans in charge of a national security company. We'll meet the founder and Chair Woman of TPS Global Security, Phranceena Halres.

And later, a conversation with a 14-year-old whose flair for fashion design is racking up credits on the runway and in her community.

But first, here's a look at some of the comments and criticisms speakers made at New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's inauguration.

January 12th, 2013
Coming up, a look at the ethnic cleansing crisis in Dominican Republic involving Haitians and their decendants who are being forced out of the country.

Plus, an interview with Dr. Rudy Crew, former New York City chancellor and now, president of Medgar Evers College; he'll share his plans to help students reach their higher education goals.

And, one of the few elite female African Americans in charge of a national security company. We'll meet the founder and Chair Woman of TPS Global Security, Phranceena Halres.

And later, a conversation with a 14-year-old whose flair for fashion design is racking up credits on the runway and in her community.

But first, here's a look at some of the comments and criticisms speakers made at New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio's inauguration.

January 5th, 2014 (Originally aired on October 20th, 2013)
Coming up, actors from the movie, "12 Years A Slave" talk about their challenging roles.

And, one young woman's story of courage, after getting a breast cancer diagnosis and how early detection saved her life.

Later, navigating the often times, stressful, college application for both students and their parents.

But first, as we approach the anniversary of the devastating Superstorm Sandy, here's a look back at how some Brooklyn residents were handling the aftermath of the storm, just days later.

A year later, some New Yorkers are still struggling to rebuild their lives and their homes. This afternoon, Sunny Noh, from the New York Legal Assistance Group's Storm Response Unit is here with us.

December 29th, 2013 (Originally aired on September 29th, 2013)
Coming up, it's a disease that affects one out of every 500 African American births. As we join efforts this month to educate the public about Sickle Cell Anemia, members of a local family share their story of crisis and courage.

Also ahead, we're celebrating "Africa Month" with a look at the first ever public exhibit of a one-of- kind collection of African artifacts assembled over 40 years.

And the author of "The Bald Mermaid," Interior Designer Sheila Bridges, shares her deeply personal story of how losing her hair changed everything.

Plus, a sneak peek at the engaging documentary, "Little Ballers." It follows several young basketball players who are driven to scoring big.

And who says only the guys can play the field? We'll meet champion, tackle football player, Adrienne Smith.

But first, despite a national decline in foreclosures in our area, many homeowners, especially in Brooklyn, are in still in danger of losing their homes.

Here this afternoon to offer some advise is Trisha Ocona Francis, a licensed real estate broker and member of the New York State Department of State's Real Estate Board.

December 22nd, 2013
Do you think you've got the next big idea, but need a little guidance to turn it into that million dollar winner? We're going to introduce you to "the inventress." Lisa Ascolese will tell us exactly what to do.

Also ahead, married stars from "The Real Housewives of Atlanta" talk about their new urban memoir, "Carry on Baggage."

And later, holiday magic: celebrating Kwanzaa at the American Museum of Natural History and lighting up Harlem.

But first, when Bill de Blasio is sworn in as the 109th mayor of New York City, he'll be bringing along William Bratton as the new police commissioner--his second time as the city's top cop.

December 15th, 2013
Coming up, we're celebrating the life and legacy of Nelson Mandela. He spent 27 years in prison for fighting to end apartheid, but never lost sight of his dream of a free South Africa and eventually became it's first black democratically elected president.

Shortly after Mandela's release from prison in 1990, the late Gil Noble, host of "Like It Is," interviewed him in South Africa. We'll have that interview. We'll also share memorable moments at the Riverside Church here in Manhattan where Nelson Mandela spoke during his visits to New York City.

Plus, the consul general of South Africa will be here to talk about Mandela's impact and what's next for the country he so loved.

But first, a look back at the life of Nelson Mandela who President Barack Obama called " the last great liberator of the 20th century."

December 8th, 2013
Coming up, former New York City Mayor David Dinkins on his new book "A Mayor's Life" and on what it took to become the city's first black mayor.

Later, how African American women really feel about how they're portrayed in the media and what they'd like to see. The results of an Essence magazine study.

Plus, a sneak preview of the New York African Diaspora International Film Festival, and Grammy-nominated writer, producer Nelson Frank takes center stage with a solo career.

November 24th, 2013
Coming up, on this special edition of Here and Now, we're taking a look at some of the stories we've done this year that not only celebrate but also perhaps shed new light on the history of people of African descent in America. That includes an interview with Thomas Jefferson's sixth great grandson, the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and the assasination of Malcolm X.

And, we're celebrating 40 years of Hip Hop with some of its pioneers.

But first, we begin at the beginning of 2013 with the second inauguration of President Barack Obama. It had a decidely New York Flavor with an appearance by the famed Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir.

November 17th, 2013
Coming up, the impact of food stamp cutbacks on families in our area and what the New York City Coalition Against Hunger is doing to keep food on their tables.

Also ahead, "many faces, one dream" - an economic empowerment conference for LGBT entreprenuers and small business owners.

And, it's that time of year again: Harlem Holiday Lights 2013; we're marking the 200th anniversary of 125th street.

But first, this afternoon why slavery still matters. As painful as it may be to watch, many critics are calling the movie, "12 Years A Slave," a must see. The film is based on a memoir written by a man who was born free and sold into slavery before the Civil War.

November 10th, 2013
Coming up, we're marking Veteran's Day by paying homage to the Tuskegee Airmen.

One of the local heroes, Juluis Freeman, shares what it was like serving in a segrated military.

We'll also hear from a young man who walked from New York to Los Angeles to raise awareness for diabetes.

Plus, there's still time to get on the bus and join the upcoming New York City Omega Black College Tour. We'll tell you how prospective students can get involved.

But first, outrage over the treatment of black shoppers in major retail stores. At least four people have complained recently about being racially profiled as they shopped - two customers at Macy's in Herald Square and two Barneys shoppers.

October 27th, 2013
Coming up, should the state of New York continue to try children as young as adults? We'll hear why some are calling to raise the age limit.

Later, we'll meet one young woman from Kenya, who wants to eliminate female genital cutting and offer alternative rites of passage for young Maasai girls.

The author of the wedding gift, talks about historical, modern day slavery and trafficking.

But first, we're just two weeks away from the most important election in New York City election: the mayoral race. Joining us this afternoon, is Republican candidate Joe Lhota who says he's the best choice to move five boroughs, one city, forward.

October 20th, 2013
Coming up, actors from the movie, "12 Years A Slave" talk about their challenging roles.

And, one young woman's story of courage, after getting a breast cancer diagnosis and how early detection saved her life.

Later, navigating the often times, stressful, college application for both students and their parents.

But first, as we approach the anniversary of the devastating Superstorm Sandy, here's a look back at how some Brooklyn residents were handling the aftermath of the storm, just days later.

A year later, some New Yorkers are still struggling to rebuild their lives and their homes. This afternoon, Sunny Noh, from the New York Legal Assistance Group's Storm Response Unit is here with us.

October 11th, 2013
We're marking Domestic Violence Awareness Month by sharing one young woman's story of overcoming both both physical and economic abuse, and not only re-establishing her credit-worthiness but also leading the way for others.

Also ahead, "Dentist to the Stars" Dr. Catrise Austin on why your dental health may hold the key to your overall well-being.

And, should you or shouldn't you vaccinate your child? We'll tell you about the March of Dimes Word of Mom Campaign.

Plus, we're off to a cold-blooded educational adventure from Long Island to Madagascar with Eric the Reptile Guy.

But first, we're taking a look at the NYC mayoral race. With us today, the front runner in the race: Democrat Bill de Blasio.

September 29th, 2013
Coming up, it's a disease that affects one out of every 500 African American births. As we join efforts this month to educate the public about Sickle Cell Anemia, members of a local family share their story of crisis and courage.

Also ahead, we're celebrating "Africa Month" with a look at the first ever public exhibit of a one-of- kind collection of African artifacts assembled over 40 years.

And the author of "The Bald Mermaid," Interior Designer Sheila Bridges, shares her deeply personal story of how losing her hair changed everything.

Plus, a sneak peek at the engaging documentary, "Little Ballers." It follows several young basketball players who are driven to scoring big.

And who says only the guys can play the field? We'll meet champion, tackle football player, Adrienne Smith.

But first, despite a national decline in foreclosures in our area, many homeowners, especially in Brooklyn, are in still in danger of losing their homes.

Here this afternoon to offer some advise is Trisha Ocona Francis, a licensed real estate broker and member of the New York State Department of State's Real Estate Board.

September 22nd, 2013
Coming up, NYC Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott is here to share his new lesson plan for students and teachers.

We'll also meet the cast of "Breakfast With Mugabe," a dramatic play about the president of Zimbabwe's struggle with depression.

Later, Disney Junior's "Doc Mcstuffins" shows how the show has inspired a group of black female doctors to focus on encouraging children of color to become physicians.

We'll hear from the new host of "Who Wants To Be A Millionaire," funny man, Cedric the Entertainer!

And, Celebrity Stylist Syretta Scott has some tips for keeping natural hair healthy and stylish.

But first this afternoon, September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month.

Each year thousands of women are affected by this illness.

Joining us today to give us the facts and the warning signs: Dr. Benjamin Schwartz, Chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, and Valerie Sully, a volunteer for the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition.

September 15th, 2013

Coming up this afternoon, commerorating the 50th anniversary of the Birmingham bombing of 1963 at the Kennedy Center, with a stage reading of the play "Four Little Girls."

And, "you want caviar, but have money for chitlins." PR expert and author, Karen Taylor Bass, offers tips on branding your company, like nobody's business.

Also, one soldier's juicing tactic to surviving in Afghanistan.

Plus, a 15-year-old girl, nicknamed BamBam, who's a U.S.A. Junior World Taekwondo black belt, from Staten Island.

But first, we're turning our attention to the NYC mayoral primary. Joining us is Basil Smikle, Jr., a political strategist, who was a top aide to Hillary Clinton during her first campaign for the Senate. welcome.

September 8th, 2013 (Originally aired on June 9th, 2013)

We'll meet one young man who owns three businesses, including a new yogurt place in Bed-Stuy.

And later, an MTA program that's bringing some small companies full speed ahead, by increasing contracts awarded to women and minority businesses.

Plus, the new artist Shaliek sings and talks about "the past."

But first, we're turning our attention to a more serious story of how cyber-bullying is being blamed for the death of a 12-year-old girl.

This afternoon, Richard Valle, a parent from I.S. 109 in Queens Village, is here with us in the studio. Dr. Cynthia Grace, Director of Psychology at Harlem Hospital, also joins us.

And just last week, a memorial was held for Malcom Shabazz, the grandson of slain black activist Malcolm X, and Dr. Betty Shabazz, who was murdered in Mexico.

Hundreds of people gathered at the First Corinthian Baptist Church in Harlem to pay their respects. Our condolences go to the Shabazz family.

August 25th, 2013

Every year in the U.S., more than 12 million people are arrested, and most of them are represented by public defenders.

"Gideon's Army" is a documentary, airing on HBO, that takes an inside look at the criminal justice system through the eyes of public defenders and in doing so, reveals the injustices often visited on indigent clients.

This year, "Gideon's Army" was honored with a Sundance Editing Award.

With us today, the producer and director, Dawn Porter is here.

August 18th, 2013

Why is the war on marijuana a disporportionate war on people of color? The ACLU is here to talk about the first report to examine both state and county marijuana arrests by race.

And, the Men's Gay Health Crisis Organization is here to tell us what they're doing to fight a new strain of meningitis as well as an increase in HIV and AIDS cases.

Later, we'll tell you about the four-year brotherhood: Sister Sol Organization's Rites of Passage Program for Boys and Girls.

Plus, we're celebrating 40 years of hip hop with the founder of hip hop, DJ Kool Herc, Cindy Campbell and the man behind "Video Music Box," Ralph C. Daniels, are in our studio!

August 4th, 2013 (Originally aired on May 19th, 2013)

How will immigration reform affect the black community? We'll share highlights from the National Action Network Convention held here in New York.

Plus, an interview with Whitney Houston's mother, Cissy Houston, who spoke to Eyewitness News anchor Lori Stokes about her beloved daughter she shared with the world, and wrote about in "Remembering Whitney."

The sensational acapella group "Take 6" celebrates their 25th anniversary, right here in our studio.

July 28th, 2013 (Originally aired on April 21st, 2013)
We meet one of the most unsung civil right's heroines, who challenged the segregated Montgomery Bus Company, before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat.

Also, some social entrepreneurs share their modern day missions.

And more about an organization known as "WARM" that's helping folks on both sides of domestic violence.

Plus, we'll meet a three-time New York Times best-selling author, who launched her career behind bars.

July 21st, 2013
This afternoon, continuing calls for justice for Trayvon Martin. We take a look at the verdict in the George Zimmerman trial, which many say is yet another case of injustice for black boys and men in America.

Was it a case of self defense? Did Zimmerman violate Trayvon Martin's civil rights? The NAACP is calling for a federal investigation.

Joining us first today, Attorney Royce Russell and Noel Leader Co-Founder of "100 Blacks In Law Enforcement Who Care".

July 14th, 2013
Why is it that New York City has some of America's hungriest kids in the nation? We'll tell you about a summer nutrition program that's making a difference.

We'll meet New York City mayoral candidate, Adolofo Carrion, who is the nation's first Director of Urban Affairs.

But first, this afternoon we're taking a look at the issue of race in America. Is our nation still anti-black in 2013? Our guests today are here to offer their opinions and reactions to news headlines pertaining to race that have gotten a lot of attention.

Our guests are Elinor Tatum, Publisher and Editor in Chief of the Amsterdam News, Wendy Wilson, News Editor for Essence Magazine and Dr. Khalil Muhammad, Director of the Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture.

June 30th, 2013
Coming up, the search for African American donors that could help save the life of an eleven-year-old girl in need of a bone marrow transplant.

Plus, notes from musican extraordinaire Ray Chew, as we celebrate African-American Music Appreciation month.

But first, a major blow to the Landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965.

A deeply divided Supreme Court, by a vote of 5 to 4, stripped the government of its most potent tool to stop voting bias. It threw out the requirement that all or parts of 15 states with a history of discrimination in voting, including areas in New York City that get federal approval before changing the way they hold elections.

Is the ruling a marker of racial progress or proof of backsliding?

Joining us this afternoon Natasha Korgaonkar, Assistant Counsel from the NAACP Legal Fund and Attorney Machelle Sweeting.

June 23rd, 2013 (Originally aired on May 12th, 2013)
We looked at the challenges of raising children with autism, meeting the author of "Journey with Julian," Dwayne Ballen. The award winning journalist shared his family's heartwarming story.

Also, a home-visiting asthma program that serves as a breath of fresh air for New York City children. And Entertainers for Education Alliance encourages local students to reach for the stars and stay in school. Plus, "Mama I want to Sing" celebrates 30 years!

June 16th, 2013:
We're going to share with you how some parenting programs in our area are helping strengthen the connection between fathers and their children, even when they're not living under the same roof. "Father's Now" in Newark, New Jersey calls it their "transitional parenting" program.

We'll also have some health advice for dad that may hold the key to a longer, healthier life.

And later, Musician Wyclef Jean talks candidly about some of the difficult chapters in his life, including his relationship with his late father.

But first, we are going to re-visit the Trayvon Martin case, as the second degree murder trial of his accused killer, George Zimmerman, gets underway. The shooting of the unarmed teen in Florida sparked a nationwide wave of outrage, including here in New York City.

June 9th, 2013:
We'll meet one young man who owns three businesses, including a new yogurt place in Bed-Stuy.

And later, an MTA program that's bringing some small companies full speed ahead, by increasing contracts awarded to women and minority businesses.

Plus, the new artist Shaliek sings and talks about "the past."

But first, we're turning our attention to a more serious story of how cyber-bullying is being blamed for the death of a 12-year-old girl.

This afternoon, Richard Valle, a parent from I.S. 109 in Queens Village, is here with us in the studio. Dr. Cynthia Grace, Director of Psychology at Harlem Hospital, also joins us.

And just last week, a memorial was held for Malcom Shabazz, the grandson of slain black activist Malcolm X, and Dr. Betty Shabazz, who was murdered in Mexico.

Hundreds of people gathered at the First Corinthian Baptist Church in Harlem to pay their respects. Our condolences go to the Shabazz family.

June 2nd, 2013:
As the New York City mayoral race heats up, we're talking to the candidates who say they'd like to be the next occupant of City Hall.

Plus, a look at why African Americans aren't getting the organ transplants they need.

And later, we'll meet the playright behind "This Is Why I Whisper," which explores how her own family coped with a sibling's schizophrenia.

First, we're returning to the case of Remarley Graham. He's the 18-year-old shot to death by a New York City police officer in the bathroom of his home. A Bronx judge recently threw out the indictment against NYPD Officer Richard Haste, angering the teen's parents who were in the courtroom. Joining us are Ramarley's parents, Francelot Graham and Constance Malcolm, along with their attorney, Jeffrey Emdin.

May 19th, 2013:
How will immigration reform affect the black community? We'll share highlights from the National Action Network Convention here in New York.

Plus, an interview with Whitney Houston's mother, Cissy Houston, who spoke to Eyewitness News anchor Lori Stokes about her beloved daughter she shared with the world and wrote about in "Remembering Whitney".

Also, the sensational acapella group "Take 6" celebrates their 25th anniversary, right in our studio.

May 12th, 2013:
We looked at the challenges of raising children with autism, meeting the author of "Journey with Julian," Dwayne Ballen. The award winning journalist shared his family's heartwarming story.

Also, a home-visiting asthma program that serves as a breath of fresh air for New York City children. And Entertainers for Education Alliance encourages local students to reach for the stars and stay in school. Plus, "Mama I want to Sing" celebrates 30 years!

May 5th, 2013:
We are taking your career to the next level with top executives who are eager and ready to offer advice on getting the job or promotion you deserve! We meet the CEO of MZM Construction Company in Newark, New Jersey and a top executive from Morgan Stanley. Plus, an "Essence" magazine editor, who is eager to share a get ahead game plan for your career! Also: Kenneth Morris, Jr. is a descendant of two of the most notable African Americans in our history books- Frederick Douglas and Booker T. Washington. He founded and is president of the Frederick Douglas Family Initiatives, and joins us to talk about the continued efforts of his family.

April 28th, 2013:
It's one thing to talk about it, but what can we do about gun violence in our communities? Essence Magazine is taking on the issue in a bold new series, "Guns Down." Also, we'll talk with the founders of Street Corner Resources and "GRAAFICS" - both groups are giving young people alternatives to dangerous lifestyles.

Also, an inspiring digitial destination for young women of color. And the daughter of the late Gil Noble updates us on the "Like It Is" archives.

April 21st, 2013
We meet one of the most unsung civil right's heroines, who challenged the segregated Montgomery Bus Company, before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat.

Also, some social entrepreneurs share their modern day missions.

And more about an organization known as "WARM" that's helping folks on both sides of domestic violence.

Pplus, we'll meet a three-time New York Times best-selling author, who launched her career behind bars.

April 14th, 2013
Coming up on Here and Now, we'll meet one of the civil rights movements most unknown heroines. She challenged the segregated Montgomery Bus Company, before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat.

Also this show, "social entrepreneurs" share their modern day missions. And a group with a mission of another kind- helping those on both sides of domestic violence.

Plus, we'll introduce you to a three-time "New York Times" best-selling author who launched her career behind bars.

April 7th, 2013
When 16-year-old Kimani Gray was killed by two New York City police officers, many in East Flatbush were outraged. Especially angry-- young people. While most of their protests were peaceful, some of the demonstrations turned violent and confrontational. With us to talk about the concerns of their peers in the community are several teens from STAT -- Students Taking Action. And also, the Dance Theater of Harlem returns to the stage.

March 31st, 2013
When 16-year-old Kimani Gray was killed by two New York City police officers, many in East Flatbush were outraged. Especially angry-- young people. While most of their protests were peaceful, some of the demonstrations turned violent and confrontational. With us to talk about the concerns of their peers in the community are several teens from STAT -- Students Taking Action.

And: Some local troubled youngsters reporting to the New York City Department of Probation are getting lessons on morals and murals.

Also, the daughter of the late Gil Noble updates us on the "Like It Is" archives. Plus: Back on their feet - the Dance Theater of Harlem returns to the stage.

March 24, 2013
Sandra Bookman will take a look at the recent case of Kimani Gray, a 16-year-old who was shot and killed by plain-clothes NYPD officers after allegedly pointing a gun at them. The incident has sparked outrage in East Flatbush in Brooklyn. Sandra will be joined by NYC councilman Jumaane Williams, who represents the area; Eric Waterman, executive director of East Flatbush Village and Shanduke McPhatter, director of Gangstas Making Astronomical Community Changes.

Later on, Sandra will look at a Supreme Court review of a section of the Voting Rights Act that is raising some concern. She will speak with Natasha Korgaoankar, assistant counsel with the NAACP Legal and Educational Defense Fund; and attorney Machelle Sweeting.

Plus, the Here and Now team will take a look at a documentary "A Tale of Two Schools: Race and Education on Long Island" that focuses on two African-American high school seniors in different school districts. Sandra will later be joined by the Elaine Gross, the president of Erase Racism New York -- the organization that produced the film.

Sandra will also explore another documentary, "180 Days: A Year Inside an American High School," that examines America's education crisis by focusing on a high school in Washington, D.C. She will speak with the principal from this school, Tanishia Williams-Minor, and Jacquie Jones, the executive director of the National Black Programming Consortium.

March 17, 2013 (originally ran on January 13, 2013)

Sandra Bookman will delve into the issue of domestic violence by talking with Sil Lai Abrams, a domestic violence activist and relationship expert who has had to overcome her own personal drama before being able to help empower women to deal with their own. They'll talk about how media may be the culprit in creating a culture of violent relationships -- among other topics.

Later on, Sandra will talk to the co-founders of the Foster Care Advocacy Foundation -- Dorin Matthews and Sylvia Hopper -- as well as Tracy Breaker, the foster care mother of two boys. They'll discuss the fact that there are more than 16,000 children in the foster care of system in New York City, many of whom are minorities who are exposed to inappropriate homes and neglectful parents.

Plus, Sandra will examine the transition from foster care to the real world by speaking with Terrance Talley at Lantern Community Services at Vicinitas Hall, a Bronx-based program helping young adults with that transition; as well as Nico Perry, a college student who had been in foster care since the age of 2.

Also, the Here And Now team will chat with Omi, a rising star of a vocalist from Kingston, Jamaica.

March 10, 2013

Sandra Bookman will sit down with Brook Bello, who recently was the main focus of Survivor, a documentary that chronicles her story of surviving abuse and sex slavery. After she shares her harrowing story, Sandra will take a look at what's being done in terms of establishing anti-sex trafficking programs in the New York area. Sandra and Brook will be joined by Carolyn Strudwick, an associate vice president with Safe Horizon, and Sonia Ossorio, the president of National Organization For Women.

Later on, Sandra will sit down with Felicia Scott, the author of Thrive: Seven Strategies For Extraordinary Living and a contributing writer for Essence.com.

March 3, 2013

Sandra Bookman will take a look at some local black football players and coaches from Paramus who were the targets of racially charged comments during a big game this past season. As New Jersey state officials continue to investigate the case, Sandra will speak with Dr. Attalah Ali, a mother of the one of the players; Noel Leader from 100 Blacks in Law Enforcement Who Care; and De Lacy Davis from Black Cops Against Police Brutality.

Later on, Sandra will take a look at LIFE Camp, a non-profit organization designed to help black and Latino youth to become leaders within their communities. She'll talk with Erica Ford, who runs the organization, as well as LIFE Camp member Juquille Johnston.

Plus, the Here And Now team recently caught up with the Harlem Globetrotters as the recently visited the United Nations International School in Manhattan to talk about the "ABC's of Bullying Prevention."

February 24, 2013

As Black History Month continues, Sandra Bookman will take a look at the role that historically black colleges such as Morehouse College, Spelman College and Howard University are playing today in the black community. She will speak with Mujaheed Bey and Barbara Reed, the coordinators of the New York City-based Omega Psi Phi Black College Tour; as well as Ricardo Nichols, the coordinator of the Black College Tour of the New Rochelle-White Plains alumni chapter of the lKappa Alpha Psi fraternity.

Plus, Sandra will talk with Dr. Robert Miller, the author of Reflections of a Black Cowboy, who will talk about mostly unknown history facts about African Americans living on the western frontier.

In addition, the Here And Now team will take a look what NAACP president and CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous said when recently denounced the NYPD's "Stop-and-Frisk" policy at a the Nazarene Congressional Church in Brooklyn.

February 17, 2013

With the anniversary of the 1965 assassination of Malcolm X on Feb. 21, Sandra Bookman will sit down with Ilyasah Shabazz, the daughter of Malcolm X and Betty Shabazz. She'll talk about her parents' legacies -- and what her thoughts on the impact they have made on younger generations.

Later on, the Here And Now team will stop by a place on the south shore of Staten Island called "Sandy Ground," which played an important but little known role in African-American history.

Plus, Sandra will sit down and talk with co-owners of American Fire Control: Londel Davis, Jr., and Keith Pearson -- two Army buddies who have grown a successful fire extinguisher business in Harlem in spite of the tough economic climate.

Also, Sandra will speak with Michael Robinson, a former Wall Street financial analyst who quit his job in favor of starting his own staffing company. He's now the author of One Hundred Pennies -- and the CEO of New York Staffing Services, which works with Fortune 100 companies and financial institutions across the country.

In addition, Sandra will chat with Peter Benjaminson, the author of Mary Wells: The Tumultuous Life of Motown's First Superstar. The Here And Team will also get a chance to preview "Motown: The Musical" -- and speak with Motown fonder Berry Gordy.

Feburary 10, 2013

As Black History Month continues, Sandra Bookman will have sit down with Shannon Lanier, the co-author of Jefferson's Children: The Story of One American Family. They will talk about how Lanier came to realize his lineage and the realization of his sixth-great grandfather -- and the third U.S. president -- Thomas Jefferson.

Later on, Sandra will look at the third annual New Voices in Black Cinema Festival that will begin on Feb. 15 with the festival's director, Curtis Caesar John, as well as filmmakers Natalie Paul and Neil Drumming.

Plus, with Valentine's Day around the corner, Sandra will speak with Essence magazine relationship expert Charreah Jackson to get some advice on how to best approach relationships these days. They will be joined by Teneshia and Michael Warner, two self-proclaimed "couple-preneuers" who have been able to successfully manage their marriage along with a thriving consulting business.

February 3, 2013

With February being American Heart Month, Sandra Bookman will sit down to talk about some of the dangers of heart disease that affect women and minorities disproportionately to others with Dr. Ilena Pina and Dr. Rita Louard from Montefiore Medical Center.

Plus, with Black History Month starting, Sandra will talk about the exhibit "Visualizing Emancipation" -- a collection of pre-and post-Civil War photographs of enslaved and free black women, men and children taking place at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture -- with Dr. Khalil Muhammad, the center's director.

Later on , Sandra will speak with Bryonn Bain, a Brooklyn-based hip-hop innovator who is currently performing his acclaimed show "Lyrics From Lockdown" through the sponsorship of the National Black Theatre. They will be joined by Gina Belafonte, the show's producer, and Sade Lythcott, the CEO's theatre.

Also, Sandra will chat with Jennifer Turner, a self-proclaimed "fitness activator" and triathlete, who is gaining recognition for her "Mad Cool Fitness" workout program.

In addition, the Here and Now team will also catch up with the Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir to hear their reflections on performing at the recent Presidential Inauguration.

January 28, 2013

With the deadline to file with FEMA regarding damage sustained by Super Storm Sandy closing in, Sandra Bookman will talk about last-minute concerns with FEMA representative Dasha Castillo and Matthew Young, a public affairs specialist for the U.S. Small Business Administration.

Later on, musician Wyclef Jean will sit down with the Here And Now team to talk about his recently released memoir, Purpose: An Immigrant's Story.

Plus, Sandra will speak with Wayetu Moore, a book publisher from Liberia who has started to make a difference in her homeland through her own One Moore Book Company.

January 20, 2013

Sandra Bookman will speak with New York City Comptroller John Liu to talk about what is being down to help settle a $250 million civil rights case that has resulted in the aftermath of the "Central Park Five" case.

Plus, Sandra will take a look at Every Mother's Son, a documentary that chronicles the controversial cases involving police shootings -- and the victims' mothers who are seeking justice. She will talk to Tami Gold, the film's producer and director; as well as Kenneth Chamberlain, Jr., whose father was killed in police in White Plains; and Chamberlain's attorney, Mayo Bartlett. They will later be joined by Constance Malcolm and Franclot Graham, the parents of Ramarley Graham who was gunned down in a bathroom in his grandmother's home about a year ago.

Also, on the eve of Martin Luther King Jr., Day, the team will stop by the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn. Sandra Bookman will later be joined by Cliff Fraiser, who is the founder of the New York Metropolitan Martin Luther King, Jr. Center For Nonviolence in the Bronx. Sandra will also talk about a new exhibit at the New York Historical Society, "The Dream Continues," with Dr. Louise Mirrer, the president and CEO of the NYHS; and Camilo Jose Vergara, the photographer behind the work.

In addition, with President Obama set to take oath at his second inauguration on Monday (Jan. 21), the Here And Now team will take to the streets to find out what some of the community's expectations are of him in his second term.

January 13, 2013

Sandra Bookman will delve into the issue of domestic violence by talking with Sil Lai Abrams, a domestic violence activist and relationship expert who has had to overcome her own personal drama before being able to help empower women to deal with their own. They'll talk about how media may be the culprit in creating a culture of violent relationships -- among other topics.

Later on, Sandra will talk to the co-founders of the Foster Care Advocacy Foundation -- Dorin Matthews and Sylvia Hopper -- as well as Tracy Breaker, the foster care mother of two boys. They'll discuss the fact that there are more than 16,000 children in the foster care of system in New York City, many of whom are minorities who are exposed to inappropriate homes and neglectful parents.

Plus, Sandra will examine the transition from foster care to the real world by speaking with Terrance Talley at Lantern Community Services at Vicinitas Hall, a Bronx-based program helping young adults with that transition; as well as Nico Perry, a college student who had been in foster care since the age of 2.

Also, the Here And Now team will chat with Omi, a rising star of a vocalist from Kingston, Jamaica.

January 6, 2013 (originally ran on Nov. 18, 2012)

Sandra Bookman will sit down with Beverly Bond, the founder and CEO of Black Girls Rock, Inc., an organization with a mission centered around promoting self-esteem of African-American woman and public service. They will later be joined by two Harlem natives and Black Girls Rock honorees from the organization's annual gala event, Alize Beal and Tiffany Bender.

Later on, Sandra will take a look at "Dress For Success," a program that is helping women get the resources they need to suit for a new job. She will speak with the organization's CEO, Joi Gordon along with a participant in the program, Tamara Bullock.

Also, representatives from the African Diaspora International Film Festival will stop by to talk about this year's festival. Sandra will be joined by festival co-founder Diarah N'Daw Spech, Tony Abulu, the director of the film, "Doctor Bello," and Nadine Patterson, director of the film "Tango Macbeth."

In addition, the Here And Now team will stop by the Showman's Jazz Club, a venue that opened 1942 and has been a haven for traditional jazz ever since.

December 30, 2012 As the year comes to a close, Sandra Bookman will look back at some of the stories the Here And Now team covered in 2012, from the re-election of President Barack Obama to checking on some Coney Island residents in Brooklyn in Hurricane Sandy's aftermath.

Later on, the Here And Now staff will catch with famed R & B recording artist Toni Braxton, who has released a new single, "I Heart You."

Also, Sandra will take a look back at a special exhibit at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the New York Public Library that centered around the work of well-known photographer Gordon Parks. Plus, we'll revisit with Collette Burnett, the owner of two Super Wings restaurants who has managed to grow her business by 25 percent in spite of the tough economy; and with playwright Lydia Diamond, the creator of the popular Broadway play, "Stick Fly."

Finally, the team will take a look back on its visit to the Uniondale (N.Y.) High School Show Choir, the winners of the grand trophy at the National Show Choir Championships at Jazz at Lincoln Center.

December 23, 2012

As the holiday season continues, Sandra Bookman will take a look at local homes and businesses that are still trying to return normalcy following the severe impact from Hurricane Sandy. She will be joined by Dasha Castillo, a media relations specialist with FEMA; and Matt Young from the Small Business Administration.

Later on , the Here And Now team will meet up with the Uganda-based African Children's Choir as they perform a variety of Christmas songs at the Tiles Center for the Performing Arts in Brookhaven, Long Island. The choir has provided a refuge for children who were orphaned by war for 25 years.

Plus, the team will stop by Grandma's Place in Harlem to get a closer look at the famed book and toy store. In addition, as Kwanzaa begins on Dec. 26, Sandra will speak with Dr. Lynda Day, an associate professor of Africana Studies at Brooklyn College, about the history and importance of the weeklong holiday celebration of African-American culture.

Also, the Here and Now team will visit a holiday concert put on by the students from Harlem School of the Arts. Later on, you'll be introduced to Michaela Deprince, a 17-year-old from Sierra Leone who has been chasing down her dreams of becoming a ballerina.

December 9, 2012

To commemorate the release of the new "The Central Park Five" documentary, Sandra Bookman will speak with two of the men whose lives where forever changed by the wrongful convictions of rape and other crimes as teenagers, Raymond Santana and Korey Wise. Later on , Sandra will sit down with the two of film's co-directors, Sarah Burns, daughter of the famed documentary filmmaker Ken Burns who also co-directed the film; and David McMahon -- as well as David Loftis, the managing attorney at The Innocence Project.

Later on, Sandra will chat with Michael Bivins, the founder of New Edition. Among the topics they'll discuss is the 30th anniversary of the famous group. Plus, the Here And Now team will go spend time with members of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater to see what recent projects they have been working on. Also, Sandra will talk to Paulette McWilliams, whose voice is well known through an array of TV and radio commercials -- even if her face is not.

December 2, 2012

As the New York City area continues to clean up after Hurricane Sandy, Sandra Bookman will take a look at the conditions that are being faced in the Far Rockaways, one of the communities that has hit hardest during the storm. She'll sit down with Aria Doe, the executive center of The Action Center as well as Gail Nayowith, the executive director of S.C.O. Family of Services; and New York City council member James Sanders Jr., who represents residents in the Far Rockaways.

Plus, with World AIDS Day taking place this past Saturday, Sandra will speak with Marlene Taylor of the Montefiore Medical Center. In spite of major steps in HIV and AIDS treatment over the years, one out of six African-American men will be diagnosed with HIV and one out of 32 will be infected, according to the Center For Disease Control. They will later be joined by Janice Sweeting-Suad, who did not discover that her fiancé had AIDS until it was too late.

Also, the Here And Now team will meet up with two young digital journalists from South Africa who covered the 2012 International AIDS Conference in Washington D.C. as part of an initiative set up by Global Girl Media. During their visit, they promoted a healthy message about HIV and AIDS, while sharing their personal stories.

Later on, the Here And Now team will visit with the Impact Repertory Theatre group, which uses performing arts and leadership training to help empower children from ages 12-19. The group recently celebrated its 15th anniversary.

November 25, 2012 (originally ran on Oct. 7, 2012)

Sandra Bookman will take a look at a controversial complaint that was recently filed with the U.S. Department of Education, alleging that the sole use of test scores for entrance to specialized high schools in New York City disproportionately excludes African-American and Latino students. She'll speak about the issue with Damon Hewitt, the director of education of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and Esmeralda Simmons, the founder and executive director for the Center for Law and Social Justice at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn.

Later on, Sandra will talk to Rev. D. Herbert Daughtry, the pastor of The House of Lord Church and founder of the Downtown Brooklyn Neighborhood Alliance, about the benefits the development of the Barclays Center will bring to the surrounding community. Joining them will be Sharon Daughtry, the president of the organization.

Plus, the Here And Now team will meet up with Shirley Sherrod, a former U.S. Department of Agriculture employee who was fired because of false accusations of racism and the author of The Courage of Hope.

Also, Sandra will sit and talk about helping students plan and be mentored for college with Jay Gardner, the founder of the The Ivy Key Ttutoring Company and Udai Tamber, the executive director of South Asian Youth Action.

In addition, Sandra will take a look at the Wight Foundation in Newark, which has helped decrease the city's schools' dropout rate for close to 30 years. She will be joined by Ivan Mays, the foundation's executive director, and Shakirah Miller, an alumnus of the program.

Sandra will also sit down with Ryan Mote, a young man who recently earned one of the first $30,000 scientific scholarships handed out by the American Museum of Natural History to pursue his passion of becoming a paleontologist.

November 18, 2012

Sandra Bookman will sit down with Beverly Bond, the founder and CEO of Black Girls Rock, Inc., an organization with a mission centered around promoting self-esteem of African-American woman and public service. They will later be joined by two Harlem natives and Black Girls Rock honorees from the organization's annual gala event, Alize Beal and Tiffany Bender.

Later on, Sandra will take a look at "Dress For Success," a program that is helping women get the resources they need to suit for a new job. She will speak with the organization's CEO, Joi Gordon along with a participant in the program, Tamara Bullock.

Also, representatives from the African Diaspora International Film Festival will stop by to talk about this year's festival. Sandra will be joined by festival co-founder Diarah N'Daw Spech, Tony Abulu, the director of the film, "Doctor Bello," and Nadine Patterson, director of the film "Tango Macbeth."

In addition, the Here And Now team will stop by the Showman's Jazz Club, a venue that opened 1942 and has been a haven for traditional jazz ever since.

November 11, 2012

In honor of Veterans Day, Sandra Bookman will sit down and speak with two Vietnam veterans: Saoul Mamby and James Anderson. Later on, Sandra will look into the role that the National Association For Black Veterans and the Black Veterans For Social Justice have played in the African-American community with Herbert Sweat, Wendy McClinton and Dr. Charles Mamar, who are involved with both organizations.

In addition, Sandra will look ahead to President Obama's second term with Dr. Julianne Malveaux, an economist and columnist for Essence magazine, as well as Wendy Wilson, Essence's news editor. Also, we'll see what the Here And Now team encountered when they headed to Coney Island in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy on Election Night.

Plus, Sandra will be joined by T.S. Monk Jr., the son of legendary jazz musican Thelonious Monk as well as Reed Hadley, the founder of Jazz Backstage and one his participants, Ethan Reed. They'll talk about how Jazz Backstage is helping connect a wide array of generations to the musical genre.

November 4, 2012

With Election Day around the corner, Sandra Bookman will examine the issue of female voting within the African-American community by speaking with Dr. Julianne Malveaux, an economist and columnist for Essence magazine; and Wendy Wilson, the news editor of Essence. Later on, the Here And Now team will profile Barbers For Obama, a grassroots group that has actively been trying to get people registered to vote.

Plus, Sandra will talk with Joseph "Jazz" Hayden, the founder of AllThingsHarlem.com. The website has been documenting some of the stop-and-frisk policy cases against the NYPD -- including Hayden's own case. They will be joined by Hayden's attorney, Gideon Oliver, and Noel Leader, the co-founder of 100 Blacks in Law Enforcement Who Care.

Also, Sandra will talk with two guest from Samaritan Village, an agency that provides comprehensive services for substance abusers: Roy Kearse, the organization's vice president of residential treatment; and Sheaneen Holimon, a house counselor.

Later on, Sandra will preview the American Diabetes Association's Expo taking place on Nov. 3 at the Javits Convention Center by speaking with Dr. Jerome Tolbert, Dr. Reba Williams and Charles Cheeseboro, who is living with Type 2 diabetes.

In addition, with National Breast Cancer Awareness Month still taking place, Lakesha Jackson will stop by. She's the founder of Pink Shoes Inc., an organization that offers support to women ages 40 and younger who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. She'll address the fact with Sandra about how African-American women are more likely to develop more aggressive advanced stage breast cancer at a younger age than any other age group. They will be joined by breast cancer survivor Tameka Boyajian.

Lastly, the Here And Now team will catch up with actor Don Cheadle to talk about his supporting role alongside Denzel Washington in the new film "Flight."

October 21, 2012

With Election Day right around corner, Sandra Bookman will take a look at the recent presidential election held this past week at Hofstra University. She will be joined by Democratic analyst Roy Paul and Republican analyst Brandon Brice.

Later on, Sandra will sit down with Gary Heward, whose personal fall from grace from the ranks of corrections officer on Riker's Island is detailed in his book, Corruption Officer.

Plus, the Here And Now team will catch up with former NFL player Ray Lucas, who will speak candidly about his longtime addiction to prescription drugs.

Also, Sandra will speak with playwright Katori Hall, who has earned acclaim for her latest play, "Children of Killers," which sheds light on the horrific episodes of genocide that have taken place in Rwanda by introducing the audience to the children left behind by their parents who were convicted murderers.

And with the ING NYC Marathon just a few weeks away, Sandra will speak with Jonathan Eustache, who will be running to gain awareness for his native Haiti; and Marie Yolaine Eusebe, the founder of the organization he will be representing, Community Two Community (C2C).

October 14, 2012

Sandra Bookman will sit down with Dr. Robert Gore, an E.R. doctor at King's County Hospital Cetner who will talk about the program he has established to help save young people from being victims of violence. It's called The Kings Against Violence Initiative (KAVI). Joining Sandra and Dr. Gore, will be Dr. Reinaldo Austin, a program advisor and mentor.

Later on, with October being Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Sandra will speak with Suzette Sheppard, the founder of the Brooklyn chapter of the Sisters Network, an organization with a mission of spreading the word of how the cancer affects the lives of African-American women.

Plus, self-made millionaire Paul. D. Jones, the author of Schedule For Success, will come by to share some insight on how to achieve your goals of having financial freedom.

October 7, 2012

Sandra Bookman will take a look at a controversial complaint that was recently filed with the U.S. Department of Education, alleging that the sole use of test scores for entrance to specialized high schools in New York City disproportionately excludes African-American and Latino students. She'll speak about the issue with Damon Hewitt, the director of education of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and Esmeralda Simmons, the founder and executive director for the Center for Law and Social Justice at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn.

Later on, Sandra will talk to Rev. D. Herbert Daughtry, the pastor of The House of Lord Church and founder of the Downtown Brooklyn Neighborhood Alliance, about the benefits the development of the Barclays Center will bring to the surrounding community. Joining them will be Sharon Daughtry, the president of the organization.

Plus, the Here And Now team will meet up with Shirley Sherrod, a former U.S. Department of Agriculture employee who was fired because of false accusations of racism and the author of The Courage of Hope.

Also, Sandra will sit and talk about helping students plan and be mentored for college with Jay Gardner, the founder of the The Ivy Key Ttutoring Company and Udai Tamber, the executive director of South Asian Youth Action.

In addition, Sandra will take a look at the Wight Foundation in Newark, which has helped decrease the city's schools' dropout rate for close to 30 years. She will be joined by Ivan Mays, the foundation's executive director, and Shakirah Miller, an alumnus of the program.

Sandra will also sit down with Ryan Mote, a young man who recently earned one of the first $30,000 scientific scholarships handed out by the American Museum of Natural History to pursue his passion of becoming a paleontologist.

September 30, 2012 Sandra Bookman will look at the recent violent attacks that have happened to MTA bus drivers in the New York City. After revisiting the issue through Eyewitness News footage, Sandra will speak with Frank Austin, chairperson for the TWU Local 100 along with two drivers who have been assaulted on the job: Lisa Clarke and Thomas Dillard.

Later on, Sandra will sit down with Mike Tucker, the founder of "Lay Your Guns Down" -- as well as the organization's president, Emily Chaney, and her daughter, Francesca, who is also a community activist. They will take a look at how Tucker was able to turn his son's tragic story into a rallying cry for the Bed-Stuy community in Brooklyn.

Also, Sandra will look into the beautiful enclave of Harlem brownstones known as Heritage Heights. She will be joined by Dr. John Caldwell, president of the Hamilton Heights Homeowners' Association, and John Reddick, an architect and Harlem curator.

Plus, Jamaica sprinter Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce will stop by the studio to talk about her latest accomplishments in the 2012 Olympics in London -- including a gold medal in the 100-meter dash. In addition, with Harlem Arts Advocacy Week starting on Monday (Oct. 1), Sandra will talk about the weeklong event with the Jewel Kinch-Thomas, the alliance's interim executive director.

September 23, 2012

The September being Sickle Cell Awareness Month, Sandra Bookman will be joined by pediatric hematologist Dr. Herald Duroseau of Interfaith Medical Center to talk about the serious disorder that was discovered 102 years ago. They will also be joined by Jahquie Martin, who has sick cell anemia, and his father, Ryan Gentles.

Also, as Election Day dears, the Here And Now team stopped by a recent community town hall meeting sponsored by the BET Network to discuss the most pressing issues surrounding the presidential election.

Later on, the Here and Now team will stop by the upscale Thrifty HoG Store on Fifth Avenue, a place to get both good buys and good stories -- as sales raised go to help local homeless families. Sandra will be joined by Deborah Koeingsberger, the founder of the store and the related Hearts of Gold organization.

Plus, Sandra will chat with A. L. Eastmond, and his son, Tyren. The Eastmonds own Easco Boiler Corporation, the oldest African-American-owned company of its kind in the country. It was first established in 1948.

In addition, the team will hang out with City Gym Boys founder Charles LaSalle, the author of the book Get a Bangin' Body

September 16, 2012

Sandra Bookman will take a look at the presidential race by sitting down with Roy Paul, a Democratic political analyst; and Brandon Brice, a Republican policy analyst; to take about their reactions to the recent national conventions of their respective parties -- among other topics.

Later on, Sandra will take a look at the case of Brandon Jackson, a young African-American man who claims he was defending himself when he stabbed two white men who attacked him. She will be joined by Jackson's mother, Gloria Fisher and his attorney.

Plus, Sandra will sit down with Jill Levy-Fisch, the president of Save Babies Through Screening Foundation, an organization with a mission of educating parents about newborn screening. They will be joined by Grace Cadeau, the mother of 2-year-old who was saved by newborn screening.

Also, the Here And Now team will check out "100 Moments," an exhibit at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture devoted to famed photographer Gordon Parks, known best for his photographic essays in Life magazine for six decades.

Furthermore, the team caught up with Charles LaSalle, author of Get a Bangin' Body and founder of the City Gym Boys who is out to mentor youngsters in urban neighborhoods -- particularly those associated with the Boys and Girls Club of Harlem.

September 9, 2012

As Fashion Week continues across the city, Sandra Bookman will take a look at Her Game 2, a company that has been making sports apparel and gear specifically for women for more than a decade -- while also providing talent management services. She will be joined Dr. Debra Williams, the company's president and CEO.

Later on, Sandra will talk with designer Elena Vasilevsky about her latest collection -- as a group of models show the garments off in the Here And Now studio. In addition, Sandra will visit with jewelry artisan David Von Kittelberger who will tell about his latest designs. Also, Ray Brown will stop by to show off some of the sharpest and most comfortable designs of his Ray Vicente Electic Collection.

Plus, the Here And Now will meet up with two young aspiring journalists from South Africa, Thokozo Mabaso and Madisa Madikane, who were selected to cover the recent International Aids Conference in Washington, D.C. as part of the efforts of GlobalGirl Media, a non-profit organization that offers teenage girls in underserved communities an opportunity to become digital journalists to let their voices be heard.

Also, the Here And Now team will look how the Rev. Al Sharpton has continued to challenge the rise of gun violence in the area through the "Occupy Corners" movement in the wake of the string of recent shootings.

August 26, 2012 (originally ran on June 3, 2012)

Sandra Bookman will sit down and chat with Grammy Award-winning singer Charlie Wilson. In the '80s, "Uncle Charlie," as he was known, had such upbeat funk hits such as "You Dropped A Bomb On Me" and "Outstanding" as the lead vocalist of The Gap Band. Today, he's using his celebrity status to help raise awareness of and fight the battle against prostate cancer.

Later on, Sandra will take a look at the topic of lupus, an autoimmune disease which is three times more common in African American women as compared to Caucasian women. She will speak with Dr. Mary Crow, the director of the rheumatology research and associate chief of rheumatology at the Hospital for Special Surgery as well as the co-director of the Mary Kirkland Center For Lupus Research. They'll also be joined by Kamillah Gilyard, who has diagnosed with lupus when she was 17 years old -- and almost died from the disease four years ago.

Also, did you know that 1.4 million African Americans are uninsured in New York City, according to the New York City Health Survey? Sandra will be joined by Julian St. Patrick Clayton, a borough representative for the Big Apple Rx free prescription card, to talk about how all New Yorkers can take advantage of the program and its large discounts.

In addition, the Here and Now team will catch up with famed R & B act Boyz II Men. The group is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year by a new album, "Twenty."

August 19, 2012

Sandra Bookman sits down with Asadah Kirkland, the author of the controversial Beating Black Kids who says it's never appropriate for a parent to spank their kid. She currently works as an administrator for an afterschool program program in Harlem.

Later on, Sandra will be joined by Erica Reid. Besides being the wife of record executive and "X Factor" judge L.A. Reid, she's also the author of The Thriving Child, a book that offers solutions on everything from managing children's allergies to forming healthy eating habits.

In addition, Sandra will find out the latest about the New York Jazz Initiative. She will chat with Rob Derke, the president and artistic director of the initiative. They'll be joined by members of Derke's New York Jazz Quartet: bassist Carlo De Rosa and drummer Eric McPherson.

Also, Sandra will speak with the popular teen group Mindless Behavior, a group that has girls screaming wherever they go. The group will talk about its latest endeavors, including their latest video, "Hello."

August 12, 2012

Sandra Bookman will look at the growing trend of gun violence -- and what is being done to try to stop it. She'll talk with Iesha Sekou, the founder and executive director of Street Corner Resources, one of the organizations on the forefront of this movement. They will later be joined by Marlon Paterson, the associated director of Youth Organizing To Save Our Streets, a Crown Heights-based group.

Later on, Sandra will be joined by representatives from a Brooklyn program, Med Troop, that is teaching kids how to respond in emergency situations with life-saving skills. She will speak with group founder Ayeronde Davis, as well as two program graduates: Tiffany Alvarez and Leitha Davis.

Plus, the creators -- and real-life couple -- of the hit show "Platanos Y Collard Greens" will share their recipe for a healthier relationship. In addition, the Here And Now team will catch up with a couple of the cast members from the Broadway musical, "Ghost," Davine Joy Randolph and Oda Mae Brown, before they hit the road to perform the show across the country.

Also, the team will take a look at an exhibit at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture honoring the work of legendary photographer Gordon Parks -- known for his photographic essays in "Life" magazine -- and will take a minute to pay tribute to Harlem's iconic restaurateur Sylvia Woods.

August 5, 2012 (originally ran on April 15, 2012)

The Here and Now team will pay a visit to The Malcolm X and Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Education Center to check out the traveling exhibit, "Freedom's Sisters," which honors 20 influential African American women.

Later on, Sandra Bookman will take a look at his year's The Network Journal's 25 Influential Black Women in Business by sitting down with Rosalind McLymont, the executive director of the Network Journal; as well as two of the honorees: Vicky Free, executive president of marketing for BET Networks; Chrysa Chin, vice president of player development for the NBA; Kim Seymour, vice prsdient of talent management for American Express and Janet Simmons, president of Global Resource Solutions, Inc.

July 29, 2012

As Harlem Week revs up, Sandra Bookman will share all of the details about this year's festivities. Now in its 38th year, the celebration will offer more than 100 events throughout the summer with an expected two million total attendees. She will speak with Jackie Roe Adams, a member of the Harlem Week board, and Ray Chew, the executive music director of Harlem Jazz and Music Festival.

In addition, Sandra will take a look at the rise in gun violence this summer in the city through the collective coverage of the Eyewitness News team. She'll later speak about the topic with Rowe Adams, who is also the mother of two boys killed by gunfire and the co-founder of "Harlem Mothers Save," an anti-gun, non-profit organization.

Later on, Sandra will interview Alexis Page, a 16 year old who has managed to overcome scoliosis to chase her Olympic dreams in rhythmic gymnastics. Alexis and Sandra will be joined by Alexis' mother, Pam Fair, and her coach, Lucy Kerznerman. To continue along the same line, Sandra will later speak with Wendy Hilliard, who became the first African-American in 1978 to represent the U.S. on the rhythmic gymnastics national team -- a feat she accomplished a record nine times. Today, Wendy runs an organization that introduces hundreds of Harlem children to rhythmic gymnastics.

Also, the Here And Now team will go check out StreetSquash, a Harlem-based organization that allows children to play squash while helping to pave the road to college through a rigorous tutoring program. In addition, famed Broadway choreographer Hinton Battle -- who has won three Tony Awards for his work with "The Wiz," "Dreamgirls" and "Miss Saigon"  will talk about his latest musical, "Love Lies -- Treat Her Like a Lady," a tale of three women who show up to their man's funeral.

Lastly, the team will check in with Jamaican born musician David M, known most for his hit single, "Lest We Forget." He's back with a new song, "Here Comes Your Life."

July 22, 2012 (originally ran on Feb. 5, 2012)

We will continue to celebrate Black History Month as Sandra Bookman and the Here and Now team take a look at the real story of Spinney Hill: a thriving African American community on Long Island that essentially vanished.

Plus, Sandra will look at the current issues surrounding the national organ transplant waiting list. She will be joined by Helen Irving, president and CEO of the New York Organ Donor Network; and Julia Rivera, associate executive director for public relations at the Lincoln Medical Center in the Bronx.

Also, Sandra will sit down with Kenneth Braswell, the executive director of Fathers Incorporated, an organization that reaches out to fathers when couples break up. Sandra and Kenneth will later be joined by Yvette Tell, a representative from Real Men Charities, Inc., an organization that has partnered with Fathers Incorporated.

July 8, 2012

As the presidential race begins to heat up, Sandra Bookman will take a look at President Obama's recent policies -- namely on his recent health care bill and immigration reform -- with Democratic political analyst Roy Paul and Richard St. Paul, a Republican civil rights attorney.

Later on, Sandra will take a look at the current City Parks Foundation's SummerStage Kids programming taking place in five boroughs. She will be joined by Monique Martin, the director of family programming for the foundation. The program is being presented by Disney, the parent company of WABC-TV.

July 1, 2012

The Here and Now team will take a look at the disproportionate number of minorities subjected to the NYPD's stop-and-frisk policy -- and the outrage it has caused in the local African-American and Latino communities.

Later on, Sandra Bookman will look into a funding contest that was sponsored by the Harlem Business Alliance to help give a jolt to the local economy. She will talk with Precious Williams, the contest winner who has launched a plus-size lingerie business, and Regina Smith, the alliance's executive director.

Plus, the team will introduce you to small-business success stories: Colette Burnett, the owner of two Super Wings restaurants, and Grandma's Place, a toy store in Harlem. Also, Sandra will be joined by attorney Lauren Raysor, the author of the book Living the Wealth Life. In addition, U.S. Olympic gold medalist Angelo Taylor will stop by to talk about going for his fourth gold medal on the track in spite being 33 years old.

Lastly, the team will stop by Uniondale High School, where the school choir recently won the grand trophy at the national championship competition.

June 24, 2012 (originally ran on March 11, 2012)

Sandra Bookman will sit down with Pamela Johnson, a.k.a "The Scholarship Lady." She is the executive director of Eastchester Heights Community Center who has helped numerous area youths find the money needed for college.

Later on, Sandra will look at the increase in teen pregnancy in New York City where an average of 8,000 babies are born to teen mothers every year. She will talk with Linda Lausell Bryant, the executive director of Inwood House, a place that has been giving help to young teenage mothers for centuries.

Plus, genealogist Ruth Hunt will stop by to talk about her free workshops, "Back To Your Roots," which encourage attendees to research their family history.

June 17, 2012

On a Father's Day edition, Sandra Bookman will chat with the president o f the National Fatherhood Initiative, Roland Warren. He'll discuss how he's getting dads prepared to stay with the 24/7 and even becoming a double-duty dad to kids without fathers. It is estimated that one out of three children in the U.S. are growing up without a father -- and that number is far worse within the African-American community.

Also, Sandra will take a look at the case of Ramarley Graham, an 18-year-old who was unarmed when he was shot inside his Bronx home by an NYPD officer in February. She'll talk with Royce Russell, the attorney representing the Graham family.

Later on, Sandra will speak with WBLS radio personality Jeff Fox to get his thoughts on the memory of the late Donna Summer and Hal Jackson, who was the first black radio announcer in network radio.

Plus, the Here And Now team will catch up with actress Sheryl Lee Ralph at the Hue-Man Bookstore in Harlem to talk about her new book, Defining Diva: Life Lessons from the Original Dreamgirl.

June 10, 2012

Sandra Bookman sits down with Asadah Kirkland, the author of the controversial Beating Black Kids who says it's never appropriate for a parent to spank their kid. She currently works as an administrator for an afterschool program program in Harlem.

Later on, Sandra will be joined by Erica Reid. Besides being the wife of record executive and "X Factor" judge L.A. Reid, she's also the author of The Thriving Child, a book that offers solutions on everything from managing children's allergies to forming healthy eating habits.

In addition, Sandra will find out the latest about the New York Jazz Initiative. She will chat with Rob Derke, the president and artistic director of the initiative. They'll be joined by members of Derke's New York Jazz Quartet: bassist Carlo De Rosa and drummer Eric McPherson.

Also, Sandra will speak with the popular teen group Mindless Behavior, a group that has girls screaming wherever they go. The group will talk about its latest endeavors, including their latest video, "Hello."

June 3, 2012

Sandra Bookman will sit down and chat with Grammy Award-winning singer Charlie Wilson. In the '80s, "Uncle Charlie," as he was known, had such upbeat funk hits such as "You Dropped A Bomb On Me" and "Outstanding" as the lead vocalist of The Gap Band. Today, he's using his celebrity status to help raise awareness of and fight the battle against prostate cancer.

Later on, Sandra will take a look at the topic of lupus, an autoimmune disease which is three times more common in African American women as compared to Caucasian women. She will speak with Dr. Mary Crow, the director of the rheumatology research and associate chief of rheumatology at the Hospital for Special Surgery as well as the co-director of the Mary Kirkland Center For Lupus Research. They'll also be joined by Kamillah Gilyard, who has diagnosed with lupus when she was 17 years old -- and almost died from the disease four years ago.

Also, did you know that 1.4 million African Americans are uninsured in New York City, according to the New York City Health Survey? Sandra will be joined by Julian St. Patrick Clayton, a borough representative for the Big Apple Rx free prescription card, to talk about how all New Yorkers can take advantage of the program and its large discounts.

In addition, the Here and Now team will catch up with famed R & B act Boyz II Men. The group is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year by a new album, "Twenty."

May 20, 2012

Sandra Bookman will look at the possible schism President Barack Obama created in the black community -- especially church communities -- with his recent announced support of gay marriage. She'll discuss the issue Rev. Victor T. Hall, the pastor of Calvary Baptist Church in Queens; Rachel Livingston, a student attending the Princeton Theology Seminary; and Pastor Joseph Tolton of Rivers at Rehoboth Church in Harlem.

Later on, the Here And Now team will take a look at some of the movies featured at the New York African Film Festival, taking place right now at various venues throughout the city.

May 13, 2012

On this Mother's Day edition, Sandra Bookman will sit down with Crystal McCrary, an entertainment lawyer who went on to be a successful writer and producer. She has recently released a new book entitled, Inspiration: Profiles of Black Women Changing Our World.

Later on, Sandra will chat with jazz singer Landau Eugene Murphy, Jr., a native of West Virginia who worked as a car washer before winning the sixth seaason of "America's Got Talent" with his spot-on renditions of Frank Sinatra classics.

May 6, 2012

Sandra Bookman speaks to Grammy singer and songwriter Toni Braxton as they speak about her personal challenges with lupis, raising her son, Diezel, who has autism, and her motivation of writing her latest single "I Heart You".

Plus, Sandra will talk with legendary actress Ruby Dee about her upcoming mother's day show, "An Evening of Spoken Word with Ruby Dee" at the Apollo Theater.

Also, Sandra will tell you about Sandy Ground, a historical African-American community that dates back to the early 19th century in Staten Island.

Lastly, Sandra will speak to WBLS vice president and general manager Deon Levingston about how millions of fans had to kiss and say goodbye to WRKS and the merger of WBLS and Kiss FM.

April 29, 2012

We will continue to reflect on the legacy of Gil Noble by re-running a "Like It Is" tribute to Gil that we initially aired last October. Hosted by our own Lori Stokes, the special will feature interviews with one of the Gil's daughters, Lisa; comedian Bill Cosby, actor Danny Glover, Rev. Al Sharpton and several of others who were regulars on the show.

April 22, 2012

We continue to celebrate the life of our own Gil Noble by taking a look back at the highlights from his memorial service that took place recently in Harlem. Those who took time to share their thoughts about Gil include "Like It Is" regulars Adelaide Sanford and Dr. Leonard Jeffries, WABC-TV President and General Manager Dave Davis, actor and activist Danny Glover and minister Louis Farrakahn.

April 15, 2012

The Here and Now team will pay a visit to The Malcolm X and Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Education Center to check out the traveling exhibit, "Freedom's Sisters," which honors 20 influential African American women.

Later on, Sandra Bookman will take a look at his year's The Network Journal's 25 Influential Black Women in Business by sitting down with Rosalind McLymont, the executive director of the Network Journal; as well as two of the honorees: Vicky Free, executive president of marketing for BET Networks; Chrysa Chin, vice president of player development for the NBA; Kim Seymour, vice prsdient of talent management for American Express and Janet Simmons, president of Global Resource Solutions, Inc.

April 8, 2012

Join us this Week as Sandra Bookman celebrates the life and career of Gil Noble, prominent former host of the long running public affairs program "Like It Is," a program that ran more than 40 years on WABC-TV.

Plus, Sandra will talk with actresses Phylicia Rashaad , Leslie Uggams and Ruben Santiago-Hudson, about their creation of the first radio adaptation of the classic novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston.

Also, Sandra will tell you about the Big Brothers, Big Sisters of New York City''s new barbershop campaign to help find mentors for our youth.

March 25, 2012 (orignally ran on March 4, 2012)

Join us this week as Sandra Bookman investigates the death of 18-year-old Ramarley Graham, the unarmed teen who was shot to death by police officers in his home. Sandra will speak to Constance Malcolm, Ramarley's mother; her attorney, Royce Russell; and Noel Leader of 100 Blacks in Law Enforcement about the tragic incident.

Plus, Sandra interviews Debbie Allen. The 61-year-old award-winning actress, choreographer and dancer will talk about taking on an initiative that is near and dear to her heart.

March 11, 2012

Sandra Bookman will sit down with Pamela Johnson, a.k.a "The Scholarship Lady." She is the executive director of Eastchester Heights Community Center who has helped numerous area youths find the money needed for college.

Later on, Sandra will look at the increase in teen pregnancy in New York City where an average of 8,000 babies are born to teen mothers every year. She will talk with Linda Lausell Bryant, the executive director of Inwood House, a place that has been giving help to young teenage mothers for centuries.

Plus, genealogist Ruth Hunt will stop by to talk about her free workshops, "Back To Your Roots," which encourage attendees to research their family history.

March 4, 2012

Join us this week as Sandra Bookman investigates the death of 18-year-old Ramarley Graham, the unarmed teen who was shot to death by police officers in his home. Sandra will speak to Constance Malcolm, Ramarley's mother; her attorney, Royce Russell; and Noel Leader of 100 Blacks in Law Enforcement about the tragic incident.

Plus, Sandra interviews Debbie Allen. The 61-year-old award-winning actress, choreographer and dancer will talk about taking on an initiative that is near and dear to her heart.

Feb. 26, 2012

We continue to celebrate Black History Month as Sandra Bookman speaks to Melodie Homer, the widow of Leroy Homer Jr., co-pilot of Flight 83 on Sept. 11, 2001 -- as they reflect upon his heroic act and her mission to make it a part of history.

Plus, Sandra will head over to the Schomburg Center for Research and Black Culture in Harlem and talk with the center's director, Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammed, who is also the creator of the Lyrics From Lockdown, a Harvard student's story of wrongful imprisonment.

Also, Sandra will cover issues with gang violence and how two men in Brownsville, Brooklyn, are working to put a stop to it by saving one kid at a time.

Feb.19, 2012

Sandra Bookman will celebrate the memory of Newark's own music superstar, Whitney Houston. She will first be joined by Valerie Simpson, who wrote one of Houston's biggest hits, "I'm Every Woman." Later on, WBLS radio personality Jeff Fox, who interviewed the star numerous times, will reflect on Houston's remarkable career. Plus, Sandra will speak with Constance White, the editor-in-chief of Essence Magazine to talk about how Houston's natural beauty impacted African-American woman as a whole.

In addition, the Here and Now team will continue to celebrate Black History Month by taking a look at the Malcolm X exhibit on display at the New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and meet the center's new director, Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad.

Feb. 12, 2012

We continue to honor the proud heritage of Black History Month as Sandra Bookman speaks to renowned civil rights leader Jesse Jackson in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the Rainbow-Push Coalition, a social justice movement that combines theology with social justice and affects progressive economic, educational, and social policy in America.

Plus, Jesse will give his point of view on the presidential race, the voter ID controversy, the economy, his ongoing fight for civil rights and economic justice and many more.

Also, Sandra will take a look at the Broadway Play Stick Fly. In addition, the Here and Now team will take a glimpse into Lee Lee's Bakery in Harlem where a baker puts a soulful twist on a rare Jewish treat.

Feb. 5, 2012

We will continue to celebrate Black History Month as Sandra Bookman and the Here and Now team take a look at the real story of Spinney Hill: a thriving African American community on Long Island that essentially vanished.

Plus, Sandra will look at the current issues surrounding the national organ transplant waiting list. She will be joined by Helen Irving, president and CEO of the New York Organ Donor Network; and Julia Rivera, associate executive director for public relations at the Lincoln Medical Center in the Bronx.

Also, Sandra will sit down with Kenneth Braswell, the executive director of Fathers Incorporated, an organization that reaches out to fathers when couples break up. Sandra and Kenneth will later be joined by Yvette Tell, a representative from Real Men Charities, Inc., an organization that has partnered with Fathers Incorporated.

Jan. 29, 2012

Sandra Bookman will take a look at the challenges that Barack Obama faces this year in reclaiming the presidency with political analyst Roy Paul and New Rochelle (N.Y.) councilman Richard St. Paul.

Plus, Sandra will speak with Betsy Benedith, a former teacher, dean and assistant principal at Malverne High School on Long Island who claims that the school discriminated against her and two other staff members because they were African-American. Benedith will be joined by her attorney, Steven Morelli. Later on, Sandra will also welcome the other two staff members making the claim: Kenneth Smith and Sherwyn Besson.

Also, the Here and Now team will check out Alvin and Friends, a new Southern and Caribbean restaurant started by former model Alvin Clayton.

Jan. 22, 2012 (originally aired on Dec. 18, 2011)

ABC7's Sandra Bookman will sit down with Newark Mayor Cory Booker, who is now in his second term, to find out how he is doing in his mission to create change in New Jersey's largest city. Among the topics the two will discuss are Booker's commitment to fight prison re-entry and him being recently named the honorary vice chairman of Michelle Obama's national initiative, "Let's Move!" -- an effort to fight childhood obesity.

Later on, Sandra will talk with Jae Gardner, who has founded a Manhattan-based tutoring company called "The Ivy Key," which employs Ivy League graduates to help students get a major boost with college preparation. Joining them will be Glen Ramirez, one of Gardner's former students.

Finally, Sandra will meet the cast of the new Off-Broadway musical "Sistas," which tells the stories of a long line of African-American women through a variety of music ranging from Bessie Smith to Mary J. Blige. Sandra will sit down with the show's producer and three-time Tony winner, Hinton Battle; the show's playwright, Dorothy Marcic; and several cast members.

Jan. 15, 2012

On Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday, ABC7's Anthony Johnson and the rest of the Here and Now team will honor the occasion by taking a look the opening of the the national memorial that recently opened in King's memory and by making a visit to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn. -- located at the Lorraine Motel, the site where he was assasination.

Later on, Anthony will speak with representatives from the Service For Peace organization, based in Bridgeport, Conn.: Dr. Charles Phillips, its president; Varun Sood, the public relations manager; and Jennifer Turner of Americorps Vista. For the third year, the organization was awarded a $700,000 grant from the Corporation for National and Community Service to carry out a day of service on this upcoming Monday, Jan. 16.

Plus, Anthony will sit down with Theresa Hassler, the director of communications for the NYC Coalition Against Hunger, to find out about the group's "Serve-A-Thon," an event that kicks off during King's birthday.

In addition, Anthony will reflect on the second anniversary of the Haiti earthquakes by talking with Mathieu Eugene, a council member from Brooklyn, and Smith Georges, a Haitian-American activist and artist.

Also, Anthony will chat with legendary R & B producer and artist Leon Huff about his work, entitled "Groovy People." Huff was responsible for such hits as "Back Stabbers" and "Love Train" by the Ojays and "Me and Mrs. Jones" by Billy Paul.


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