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List of 25 words toddlers should say by age 2

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

If you spend time at the playground, you see that children have many ways of getting their point across.

But consider a vocabulary checklist.

A study out of Bryn Mawr College landed on 25 words your child should know by age 2.

They're some of the most basic and common words, but good targets.

The List of 25 Words:
Mommy
Daddy
Baby
Milk
Juice
Banana
Cookie
More
All gone
Hello
Bye-Bye
Thank You
Yes
No
Not
Dog
Cat
Hat
Bath
Ball
Book
Car
Shoe
Nose
Eye

The researcher behind the study says if your child doesn't know all 25 words, he or she may be just fine, just a late-talker.

But, it's worth discussing with your pediatrician and evaluating whether it's indicative of, perhaps, a broader problem.

"There might be something else going on. Hearing and other developmental delays so it's always worth mentioning to your doctor," said Dr. Laurie Belosa, a pediatrician.

Language delay can indicate problems with understanding or autism, perhaps.

"Some kids connect differently, some kids are shier than others, and it doesn't mean it's a sign of autism, but it's always good to just take a step back, evaluate it and talk to your doctor about it," Dr. Belosa said.

Dr. Laurie Belosa of TriBeCa Pediatrics' new Upper East Side office says at the 2-year visit, pediatricians always discuss language.

Parents say a list of words is one guide. There are others.

"I think the understanding is really key, too. So, they may not be able to verbalize it. One of my daughters did a lot of pointing for awhile until she actually started speaking, but if you know they understand you, to look for that, perhaps," said Melody Mak, a parent.

And you can help improve your child's language skills.

"Engaging with your child in everyday talk. Reading to them, interacting with them is the best thing you can do," Dr. Belosa said.

Researchers say talk slowly but naturally to your child.

And don't force your child to speak.

Language will develop more readily without added pressure.

"Anxiety is a terrible thing. I'd rather go with speech delay than anxious parent. I think that's corrosive," said Paul James, a parent.

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children, children health, health news, jamie roth
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