Sandusky sent to prison for death row inmates

11/01 1:08 PM

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky on Wednesday was sent to serve his child molestation prison sentence at an institution in far southwestern Pennsylvania that includes most of the state's death row inmates.

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky on Wednesday was sent to serve his child molestation prison sentence at an institution in far southwestern Pennsylvania that includes most of the state's death row inmates.

The Corrections Department said Sandusky was transferred to Greene State Prison after being evaluated at a facility outside Harrisburg. Prison officials said he will be housed in protective custody.

"We make individual decisions based on facts," Corrections Secretary John Wetzel said in a written statement. "Given the high profile nature of this individual, coupled with the nature of his crimes, this makes him very vulnerable in a prison setting."

Sandusky, 68, was convicted this summer of 45 criminal counts for sexual abuse of 10 boys during more than 15 years. He has maintained his innocence and is pursuing appeals.

The 30- to 60-year sentence imposed Oct. 9 means he faces the likelihood of dying in prison.

He will not have a cellmate and will be subject to heightened supervision and an escort when not in his cell. He will get an hour of individual exercise five days a week and three showers a week.

He will eat meals in his cell. Prison services such as counseling, religion, medications and treatment programming also will occur in his cell.

All visits will be non-contact, meaning no touching is allowed. He may have a TV, radio and other property, according to the Corrections Department, if he is deemed to be in "compliant adjustment."

Messages left for his attorneys were not immediately returned Wednesday.

The State Correctional Institution at Greene, as it is formally known, is a maximum-security prison that houses 1,800 inmates and employs 700 people.

Sandusky was arrested a year ago after a lengthy investigation, along with two university administrators accused of lying to the grand jury that handled the Sandusky case and failing to properly report his suspected child abuse.

Tim Curley, the athletic director on leave until the last year of his contract expires, and retired vice president Gary Schultz await trial in January and deny the allegations.

The Sandusky scandal led to the firing of longtime coach Joe Paterno, who died in January of lung cancer, and the ouster of university president Graham Spanier, who has not been charged with any crime. It shattered the football program's image and led to significant changes in the university's policies and governance.

Local

Google exec, mayor visit STEM Academy in Ashburn

Thursday, May 16, 2013

STEM Academy, a new school in the city's Ashburn neighborhood, focuses on math, science and technology.

Goode STEM Academy could be an avenue to a future in technology for the young men and women who make up the first class of freshmen. On Thursday, Google Executive Eric Schmidt and Rahm Emanuel visited the school, which the mayor hopes will lead to an investment in the city.

"Jobs are unfilled. We're having to get people from outside the country. We are not producing the skills. We have the people but we are not teaching them. The only way to solve that is start early," Schmidt said.

"There is a worldwide talent search going on. And everybody's on that race. And we have to make sure the children of the city of Chicago are well positioned for that race and if they're well positioned, the city of Chicago will be well positioned," Mayor Emanuel said.

Emanuel and Schmidt learned about programming a dice game. The hope is graduates of Goode will be ahead of the game- and would be able to walk into internships or jobs immediately.

"When I saw how you can make cartoons move and everything like that I got more into it and now I do projects on my own without homework or anything like that," Antonio Salagado, student, said.

"I want to build something that nobody has. And if I do build something, it's new. It's something entertaining that other people love," Raven Crump, student, said.

Preparing more young Chicagoans may also address a problem of diversity in tech industries, an industry that needs more women and people of color in order to thrive.

"The analytical skills that they are learning will serve them a lifetime. The future is a lot of data analysis what's going on...all of these industries are being transformed be exactly what these students are being taught," Schmidt said.

(Copyright ©2014 WLS-TV/DT. All Rights Reserved.)

Get more Local »


Tags:
local, leah hope
blog comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement