Local/State

Students display projects in the nation's oldest science fair

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Students displayed their projects Wednesday in the oldest city-wide science fair in the country.

It is Philadelphia's 35th annual George Washington Carver Science Fair held at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University.

Not only is the Carver Science Fair the oldest in the nation, it also features some of the very best science minds.

There are nearly 300 elementary school students in this phase of the competition.

All 4th through 6th graders, like Richard Yang.

"My project is about how I see which design can best withstand an earthquake," said Richard. "I found that a pyramid shape was the best to withstand an earthquake."

MaNaya Altston asks whether vinegar and baking soda will create a chemical reaction to cause a balloon to inflate itself.

"I was right about the part of it fizzing up, but the blowing up part didn't happen," said 6th grader MaNaya Alston.

The hypotheses ranged from what turns milk into plastic to blowing bottle tops to make music.

Caleigh Bristow's hypothesis involved the most absorbent diaper.

"Shoprite was the least absorbent, and my mom actually works there. It wasn't very good," said Caleigh.

Caleigh's twin sister, Courtney agreed, and twins Lauren and Brandon Archer could relate.

"Last year, we did the same to see which diapers absorb the most liquid, and we got the same results," said 5th grader Brandon Archer.

The judges look for creativity and application from the young students.

"Some of them already have an idea what they want to do," said Erwin Lewis. "For example this young lady we just interviewed, she is talking about becoming an electrician."

The results of Wednesday's judging will be announced on Friday.

"The upper school students will present their science projects on March 7th.

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students, school, philadelphia news, local/state, lisa thomas-laury
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