Local/State

First teen accused of Raleigh homeless beating death charged

Friday, July 05, 2013

Thursday, one the four teenagers to be tried as adults for allegedly beating a homeless man to death in Raleigh was officially charged with the crime.

Sixteen-year-old Tyrell Hamilton and three co-defendants were recently indicted by a Wake County grand jury - putting their cases officially in adult court. Hamilton on Thursday was the first to be booked into the Wake County adult system and his mug shot taken.

Angel Sean Muniz, Raheem Hall and Tereise Massenburg were indicted on charges of first-degree murder in June. Hamilton was indicted on a charge of second-degree murder.

Raleigh police say the youths were 15 when they came to the Capital Area Greenway in south Raleigh last November and assaulted a number of homeless men.

Regynald Jose Brown, 37, was allegedly hit in the head with a rock, killing him. His body was dumped upside down into a garbage can and half buried near Walnut Creek.

It isn't clear when the three others will be booked, but recently the mother of one of them claimed the boys have been railroaded.

"What they did to these boys was they turned these boys against each other, um, the statements don't match.  They never matched.  I got the discovery.  None of the statements these boys make are the same," offered Sabrina Muniz.

There is a fifth suspect, a 13 year old whose case remains in juvenile court and whose name cannot be released.

According to prosecutors, the teens were part of a gang called "Big Money Swag" - a subset of the "Cutthroats" gang - and the alleged attacks on Brown and others were a way for the teens to "earn their stars."

State law bars prosecutors from seeking the death penalty in murder cases where the defendants are younger than 18.

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wake county, homicide, local/state
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